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GtWalker97

Looking for handy tips and tricks

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GtWalker97

Hi folks, I'm new to the breeding game and was wondering if there were and handy tips and tricks for breeding and keeping cherries?

I have a colony of mixed grade reds (working on culling y stock, just don't have a lot of time), a small colony of blue velvets (which seem to be throwing red rillys for some reason) and a pair of wild type brown cherries, all in separate tanks. Any advice or "life hacks" would be awesome as I'm a college student on minimum wage

 

 

Thanks

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Zoidburg

Keep water parameters stable. Feed a vegetable/algae based diet with some protein. Leaves are great!

 

Can't think of anything specific really...

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sdlTBfanUK

As zoidberg  says. If all is stable and the right parameters the problem is more 'how do I get less breeding' as they are prolific breeders when these are right. Obviously if you only have a few shrimps of one type you need both sexes........... The neo's need to be about 3 months old before they are of breeding age.

Suddenly thought, I saw this vid yesterday which you may enjoy:

Simon

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GtWalker97
On 3/10/2019 at 3:21 AM, sdlTBfanUK said:

As zoidberg  says. If all is stable and the right parameters the problem is more 'how do I get less breeding' as they are prolific breeders when these are right. Obviously if you only have a few shrimps of one type you need both sexes........... The neo's need to be about 3 months old before they are of breeding age.

Suddenly thought, I saw this vid yesterday which you may enjoy:

Simon

The video was great thanks mate, but I may need to reword my original post. I'm not having any issues keeping or breeding them (I've been working in the aquarium industry for near on 7 years now and now have 100+ red cherry nymphs in the tank), I was just hoping there were a few cheats and hints out there to help me improve my stocks and produce better quality shrimp through the generations.

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jayc

Optimum water parameters. 

Culling, culling and more culling. Only keep the best quality.

Feed fresh fruit, veg, leaves and flowers, and the occasional frozen bloodworms.

If you have time, make your own food comprised of Chlorella algae and astaxanthin. 

Edited by jayc
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sdlTBfanUK

I think JayC hit the nail on the head.

I have a fish tank, very heavy planted with red cherries in it. It has been running for years and I am now at the stage that there are probably more brown wild type shrimps in there than reds but it would now be too big a job to start sorting it out so with hindsight I wish I had culled the poor quality from early on. I am not over bothered though as it is a general tank and I am more into the Taiwan bee shrimp now, and they don't have the same problem and are in a tank by themselves. I will fish out some of the brown ones to dump in the new betta tank I am setting up, but when I had a betta before he ignored them and they flourished in his tank, still I think they do good even if they can't really be seen easily.

You could sell on the lower quality ones either as food for people to use for big fish, or beginners shrimp? At least you only need 1 cull tank and can dump them all in together!

Simon

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Zoidburg

Got it. Pretty much what the others have said.

 

@sdltbfanuk - If I were in that position and wanted to "selectively breed", then I would cull the desired shrimp into a different tank! Sounds like it would be too big of a hassle to do otherwise.

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sdlTBfanUK
20 minutes ago, Zoidburg said:

Got it. Pretty much what the others have said.

 

@sdltbfanuk - If I were in that position and wanted to "selectively breed", then I would cull the desired shrimp into a different tank! Sounds like it would be too big of a hassle to do otherwise.

Thanks for that advice zoidburg. I have resigned myself to the fact it is beyond doing anything with that tank as it would mean too much upheaval, removing the plants etc to get as many shrimps as possible and even the red ones may have further brown type shrimplets. I don't really want another tank either for shrimps I don't want, but am well happy with the taiwan bee tanks phenomenal success and am currently working on my latest 'project' of a betta tank. I will stick some of the browns in that tank though in the future, when it is ready, and they can be either food or cleaning crew!

Thanks for thought though!

Simon

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