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kms

keeping Amano shrimps with Caridina and Neocaridina

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kms

Is it possible to keep them together, would they fight, eat or kill each other, and if it's possible, would Amano shrimps attack or eat the babies or new born. I have a tank with many babies just hatched these a few days ago, and want to add two Amano shrimps for algae.

 

Thanks

Edited by kms

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jojowhisky

Hello kms,
If i am not mistaken, it is best not to.
Horned nerite snails are a much safer option for your algae problem. They wont reproduce as well. (Using them in my tank and with awesome results)
Amano shrimps can be quite aggressive towards ornamental shrimps, cannot be kept together. Furthrmore you got babies in the tank, they are too precious to be eaten.
Cheers.


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kms
45 minutes ago, jojowhisky said:

Hello kms,
If i am not mistaken, it is best not to.
Horned nerite snails are a much safer option for your algae problem. They wont reproduce as well. (Using them in my tank and with awesome results)
Amano shrimps can be quite aggressive towards ornamental shrimps, cannot be kept together. Furthrmore you got babies in the tank, they are too precious to be eaten.
Cheers.


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Thanks for the reply, I have a few algae on the leaves of the plant, and whiles I also have one Horned nerite snails, I wanted to try the Amano shrimps, as I heard they are good with algae, I don't have much algae, as I have a UV light which helps out.

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jojowhisky

I see
Well, if the problem is not too bad than perhaps you might wanna give it some time?
As you already have a snail, it will get to it sooner or later.
Amanos are great algae eaters but they are not so great for a tank with neos or caridinas. (Any expert please correct me if i am wrong)

On a side, algae is not so bad. It shows your tank is alive. If its a shrimp tank, i always have this idea they are somewhat beneficial for them as they have more surface area to graze on. They also eat algae just that they eat selected algae only and mostly biofilm which will grow pretty well when you got algae on. (From what i observed, again i may be wrong) so long as its not black bush algae i think its pretty alright.
#teamalgae lol hahaha.

Happy new year

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kms

May be I should leave it how it is, here is my tank. It's a 16 L setup.

 

14dg1lh.jpg

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jojowhisky

Beautiful setup you have! Is this a new setup?
Im not sure about the surface skimmer though. Dont think its quite baby shrimp safe though i know the water surface is gonna be sparkly and clean. Otherwise, i have read it can suck babies into it.
You may put a fine mesh over it but that would render it inefficient.
To take care of the oily film, i find increasing surface agitation from the filter or an air stone to move the water quicker into the filter works. Oil skimmers are abit dangerous.
Otherwise that is a nice tank!
So this is what i do, initially when i was using a sponge filter like you(cant really see, or is that a foam over the intake of a hob filter?), so i would find the dead spot from the top(water area not moving) i would put the air stone over there, so when the bubbles rise, the water is moved and than the filter can get the water there.
You wanna form a circle current (at least thats what i call it), doing the airstone will move the water and if you adjust the filter intake strength accordingly, you can actually see the film disappear quite quickly from the top.
Its unavoidable especially in a planted tank i think(the film)
Especially if the co2 system is non solenoid regulated(diy co2 setup), you need the surface agitation at night else carbonic acid can build up in the tank.
Shrimps love oxygen thats what i observed.
*love the moss structures* looks adorable

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kms
3 minutes ago, jojowhisky said:

Beautiful setup you have! Is this a new setup?
Im not sure about the surface skimmer though. Dont think its quite baby shrimp safe though i know the water surface is gonna be sparkly and clean. Otherwise, i have read it can suck babies into it.
You may put a fine mesh over it but that would render it inefficient.
To take care of the oily film, i find increasing surface agitation from the filter or an air stone to move the water quicker into the filter works. Oil skimmers are abit dangerous.
Otherwise that is a nice tank!
So this is what i do, initially when i was using a sponge filter like you(cant really see, or is that a foam over the intake of a hob filter?), so i would find the dead spot from the top(water area not moving) i would put the air stone over there, so when the bubbles rise, the water is moved and than the filter can get the water there.
You wanna form a circle current (at least thats what i call it), doing the airstone will move the water and if you adjust the filter intake strength accordingly, you can actually see the film disappear quite quickly from the top.
Its unavoidable especially in a planted tank i think(the film)
Especially if the co2 system is non solenoid regulated(diy co2 setup), you need the surface agitation at night else carbonic acid can build up in the tank.
Shrimps love oxygen thats what i observed.
*love the moss structures* looks adorable

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Thanks for the comment, I have had the tank for about 4-5 months now, I only turn on the skimmer few hours a day normally, but keep it off now until the babies are at least 6-7mm long, most of those shrimps you see in the tank, about 20 are actually babies from my blue shrimps, I have a Fluval C2 hang on filter which keeps the water surface moving, I also have a small low power sun sun hang on fliter which is on few hours a day, my UV light is in that filter.

The Co2 I use is a intense and is a solenoid, every thing is control from a WIFI power strip though timer or manual control using a app on a smartphone.

The light I use is the Fluval plants Nano 3.0 and has a sunset and dawn feature.

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jojowhisky

Im sure everything will be fine!
Fancy equipment! I dont have half as awesome of equipments as you do! My co2 setup is semi high tech (neo co2) coz i just want good growth on quite basic plants.
Wish you luck that everything will get resolved(im sure it will)
Peace and love for the new year!

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kms

:happy:thanks, and a happy new year to you.

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