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TheKeeper

So I currently have a 6 gallon planted tank that has been set up and running for 3 weeks. Im about to purchase my red cherry shrimp to put in this tank. There is plenty of algae in the tank for them to eat, so food should be fine for the beginning correct? Plus it is heavily planted meaning there is plenty of organic matter to be consumed at all times, so they shouldn't really need to be fed ever? Also i see that drip acclimation is best for getting them used to there new home. If i did this till the tank is half empty for provided them with as close conditions as possible without emptying the tank. Am i good to just refill the tank afterward or from now on when i do water changes do they all need to be dripped in? Also is it true that adding calcium to the tank is beneficial for the shrimp to molt?

Im a pretty experienced fish keeper, just haven't ever had with shrimp so I dont want to kill all these expensive shrimps due to lack on knowledge. Any more knowledge or advice that can be given to me is high encouraged, even if it seems simple. 

Some specs of the tank, tanks does have a filter, that has small openings that could suck up baby shrimp. Its a small filter and has algae growth on the openings so it really does reduce the flow a bit, where i dont see it becoming a  huge issue. The tank is co2 injected, but thats pretty nailed down so nuking them with co2 is highly unlikely. The tank has a soil bottom capped with coarse sand. The vast majority of the bottom of the tank is carpeted with plants but they still have a way to go. There is no lid on the top of the tank. The tank does have some natural river stones in it with the brown algae growth on them. And a lot of the plants have the white "bugger" algae growing on them or around them. The tank receives about 10 hours of light a day. I know i put a lot of un-important information here, but maybe a pro will see a problem here and be able to inform me so I can correct it. Thanks for your time and consideration in advance!!!!

Regards

-The Keeper

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jayc
6 hours ago, TheKeeper said:

Am i good to just refill the tank afterward or from now on when i do water changes do they all need to be dripped in?

You can refill the tank normally, as long as, the water being added is matched to the tank - pH, TDS and temperature wise.

Otherwise, dripping water back into the tank is a good practice. 

Normal weekly water changes only needs to be 10%, as shrimps are not heavy waste generators.

As with fish keeping, the most important thing to do is to get the initial cycling of the tank done properly. 

 

6 hours ago, TheKeeper said:

Plus it is heavily planted meaning there is plenty of organic matter to be consumed at all times, so they shouldn't really need to be fed ever?

You will still need to feed them. The shrimps don't eat healthy plants, so you can't count the plants as food. A varied diet is good for the shrimps. The occasional frozen blood worms for them is a good source of protein. Blanched veges and leaves are also great. Sometimes I drop in flowers from Nasturtiums and Roses that I have in the garden. This is on top of bought processed shrimp foods. 

 

6 hours ago, TheKeeper said:

Also is it true that adding calcium to the tank is beneficial for the shrimp to molt?

Yes.

If you didn't constantly add Calcium & Magnesium, the levels will drop and cause problems down the track. 

If you use RO or rainwater, adding Ca & Mg is a must. That's why shrimp keepers use remineralising mixes at each water change. Which ties in to the first point above about matching water parameters. 

 

6 hours ago, TheKeeper said:

Some specs of the tank, tanks does have a filter, that has small openings that could suck up baby shrimp.

That will need to be addressed. Block those off with sponge or stainless steel mesh.

 

With regards to tools, get yourself a TDS meter, if you don't already have one. This will help measure TDS and gives you an idea of Calcium & Magnesium levels. 

 

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TheKeeper

What should TDS be? I do already have one, also with the top of the tank being open, the shrimp wont escape right? Thanks for all the info!

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jayc
29 minutes ago, TheKeeper said:

What should TDS be?

Around 200. When it gets to 250, you know it's time for a water change.

Shrimps can be escape artists. They climb out where the filter pipes come in / out. Just make sure the waterline is an inch or two below the top.

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  • 1 year later...
Seattleshrimp

@jayc

Are remineralizers products the only way to increase tds without changes to pH? As in salty shrimp reminderalizers. 

Im under the assumption that crushed corals can increase tds as well as increase pH

 

Thanks ! 

Edited by Seattleshrimp
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