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revolutionhope

Breeding room build.. finally ..

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Matuva
On 12/10/2017 at 11:14 AM, revolutionhope said:

42632d59bc6601afe9d2bf9f4776d34d.jpg

Oooh this nice green...

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revolutionhope
Oooh this nice green...
Sadly my original babaulti are no longer around after a period of neglect I'm afraid to say. However I was surprised to discover I have 2 or 3 juveniles that are kicking about and look promising. Fingers crossed I have both sexes as they seem to be really uncommon in Australia. There's plenty of reports of people losing their colonies for some reason which is interesting because I know that in the US the babaulti seem to be quite hardy and prolific. In my case it was a nitrate spike which caused the losses.

Love and peace

Will

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jayc

Green Babaultis are quite rare in Aus. Too bad you lost most of them.

Send some over to me next time for a backup population. ✌️

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revolutionhope

Started to put some lights in. It's a pretty time-consuming affair trying to figure out placement and measure it up etc. I tidied up the airline situation and have tanks in place for purpose of measuring light positions so here is a pic!9409a655247dedd55b03bf5bcc92b703.jpg

Love and peace

Will

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