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Good algae.


Zebra
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Hello, just wanted to show another food source I grow for my shrimp and snails. 

Algae.

Just how it looks, a plastic tub filled that gets lots of direct sun, I usually fill it with old water from my planted tanks to help the process.

Its a bit full ATM lol but there's a second tub underneath for extra strength.

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I just grab a small pinch and put it straight in my shrimp tanks, they all go nuts for it.

Alternatively you could remove excess water then dehydrate it on baking paper to make a dry feed.

IMG_3280.JPG

An hour or 2 later:

IMG_3300.JPG

Edited by Zebra
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I'd like to add that if you use this method it's a good idea to ensure the container is sealed to prevent predators and parasites finding their way to your tanks..

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will

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