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It is official... babies of red/blue marble neocaridina are...


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    • Patrick Gagnon
      By Patrick Gagnon
      I recently put in an order for 12 blue dream and 12 cherry shrimp. The shipping was delayed, Harrisburg PA distribution is terrible. Took over 9 days for them to arrive. 0 DOA. Nice! Anyway I've had them now for I'd say 2 weeks. One already is pregnant! And I recently found a guest staying. I have copepods all over, I heard they are fine. I'm not sure what this is. Looks to have antennas, like a snail or something.

    • SonoranStorm
      By SonoranStorm
      Hi all.
      So some background
      My 10g tank has:
      Blue Dreams
      Amanos
      1 Cardinia that stowed away in a plant shipment I got
      3 Rainbow Paskais
      1 Celestial Danio
      Phoenix Moss
      Crinum Calamistratum (Onion Plant)
      Nymphaea Zenkeri (Tiger Lotus)
      Bolbitis Heudelotii (Creeping Fern)
      Eleocharis sp. Mini (Mini Dwarf Hairgrass )
      Micranthemum (Monte Carlo)
      A random piece of Subwasstertang
      algea but i dont want that
      The overall goal of this tank is to be a shrimp tank with the neos and maybe a species of Caridina once I'm a little more experienced. But I have a hard time keeping the neos alive a friend who owns the LFS ive been buying them at recommended i try buying from a local shrimper because his shrimp might be more well suited to the local water than the shrimp he buys from abroad because he thinks its weird that im having a tough time with Neos. So I did just that when i met up with him he told me co2 might be the issue since it makes the water acidic and makes molting hard and it makes the water parameters more unstable so I stopped using Co2 for the time being and the shrimp look healthy. But the issue is I would like to keep using Co2 for the benefits to the plants and because id like to keep the carpet ive been working on.
      Current Parameters
      Temp: 74.5 F/ 23.6 C
      Ph: Between 6 and 6.4 (im bad at colors) but its yellow (API Test)
      Kh: 4 drops the chat says 4 degrees 71 PPM
      Gh: 6 drops the chart says 6 degrees 107 PPM
      TDS: Waiting on a meter from amazon.
      Lights are on between 4 PM and 9:30 PM for those who don't do the military time. Bellow are the spectral percentages of light if this helps anyone.
      Any advice on how and if I should add Co2?

    • stlcopperhead
      By stlcopperhead
      Hi all, 
      I’m confused about the ID on this parasite/infection my neo has. She has nothing on her head/rostrum at all...it seems to be mostly around her eggs, with some on her shell, off to the side.
      I’ve done one salt dip on her already, and no change so far. 
       
      I have some great pics of it, but even a single pic is apparently much to be posted here. Can someone help me out with that? Newbie, here. ?
       
    • sdlTBfanUK
      By sdlTBfanUK
      It is probably too early to start this but as I have no idea really what I am doing I thought it a good idea to maybe get others thoughts/ideas from the beginning?
      The aim is to find out if I can reduce the life of the 'buffering' of soil substrates for anyone wanting to use soil substrate with cherry shrimps which do better at higher PH than buffering substrates run, until they are exhausted, and before they get shrimps in the tank - that can't be many people I know???
      I set up a betta tank mid March and the buffering with the JBL substrate stopped about 4 months later., though you may be able to knock off a month as I was only doing part (25%) water changes?  Obviously no one wants to wait that long so I am just trying this experiment as I have 2L of shrimp king soil left over anyway. that I won't use!
      At the moment I have put 5L dechlorinated tap water in a bucket with 1L of substrate. The tap water is PH7.5 (KH3, TDS 154) and I am planning to do 50% water changes twice a week until the PH gets back to the 7.5 at which point I can assume it is exhausted? I will then try the same experiment using PH+ to see if that will speed up the process, but I haven't ordered that just yet?
      Any suggestions, am I doing it correctly, does it even make any sense?
      So this should give me an idea of how long it will take to stop buffering just using tap water but doing twice weekly 50% water changes, and then whether using PH+ would speed it up notably?
      This is just to get an idea, and different soil substrates will probably be different so I am not really looking for a definite answer as to the time length etc, more an idea as to whether either of these will work well for others in the future that want to keep cherry shrimp with the soil substrates. Having said that I have always kept cherry shrimp in lower than recommended PH (to start wirh) without a problem anyway?
      Simon 
       
    • FrumpyJack
      By FrumpyJack
      I have only been keeping Neocaridinas for about two months now, I have 10 blue dream neos in one tank, and 12 orange neos in a separate tank. The tank with the 10 blue dream neos has been slightly problematic though because it's a smaller tank and waste builds up a little faster.
      That being said, can anybody ID this swimmer in my shrimp tank? There is only 1 that I can see, it appears to have an exoskeleton almost like a shrimp, and it swims at the surface of the water by whipping its tail. I don't think it's a baby shrimp fry because I'm just now seeing my first female berried up and there haven't been any births before, but I suppose it is possible a fry snuck in with my order. Any help would be appreciated ?

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    • beanbag
      yes, it's the shed shells. now that I think about it, I also remember in the video the bugs were clear, and I have seen clear ones before too, a long time ago.  But these recent ones were dark colored. So I have two tanks.  In one of them, where I normally have this problem, I have been dosing antibiotics.  The short version is that most of the shadow panda and RWP shrimp have got this disease, but they haven't died either.  But they don't recover either.  They just simply stop growing and stay at a small size with stumpy short antenna.  The first shadow panda that got this problem is still alive maybe 2-3 months later. In my other tank which often doesn't have this problem also got it, but it seems to have hit harder, where both "almost adult" shadow panda suddenly got it and died within a few days.  Antibiotics didn't save them.  It's too weird - it seems like this problem comes on suddenly, with no trigger that I can think of.  (besides "the weather was warm and I ran the air conditioned".  This doesn't actually affect the water temperatures since I have a chiller, but maybe something blew into the tank?)
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Sorry for the delay, I have been searching on here and the wider web but cannot find what you are referring too! I do know which video you are talking about and remember seeing it. The video was of a shed shell rather than a live shrimp! Are you seeing them on live shrimp? From memory I don't think it was anything to worry about and I very much doubt it would discriminate between different colours of shrimp, but was probably nothing to worry about and just part of the life in aquariums, like detritus worms and other life forms. I think they were colourless in the video, if my memory is any good? Are you still getting shadow panda deaths?
    • beanbag
      Hello folks, I remember reading about this a few years ago but for the life of me cannot find this info / thread again. Can somebody point me to a link for this info? I forgot the forum I saw it on. There was a discussion about how if you look at a shrimp molt shell under a microscope or loupe, sometimes you can see tiny "bugs" or whatever moving around inside. At that time, I think the conclusion was that maybe it was a symbiotic relationship because it even happened with healthy shrimp. But I can't remember if this occurred only in neocaridina or caridina also? I just happened to look at a shadow panda's (caridina) shell who is sick with the "shortened antenna disease" that I always complained about. There were tiny blue/black spots moving around inside.  I also looked at the molt shells of some blue bolts that don't have this problem, and there were very few, or none, spots moving around inside the molt shell. I wonder if this could be some symbiotic relationship gone wrong and is the actual (proximate) cause of the problem.  (Since antibiotics didn't really seem to work) In that case, I would need some kind of anti-parasite medication to cure the shrimps.  What are the typical internal anti-parasite medications for shrimps?
    • sdlTBfanUK
      You may end up losing this batch entirely but then you can start completely fresh and get the aquarium set up right for the next batch of shrimp! If you do any large water changes then try and add the new water slowly, either dripper or some other way. You should get yourself a TDS meter (as JayC above), they are cheap and readily available. You should always use a GH tester kit as well with shrimps, if you do the 50% water change that should halve the GH so you should get a reading after that, or if you can get a local fish store to test it for you that will give you an idea of the GH. If your water supply is as hard as it appears it may be you will need to mull over how (or even IF) you want to keep shrimps as that may mean using RO or distilled/bottled water and buying a proper shrimp specific remineraliser? That will be quite expensive but you won't then have to mess about adding crushed coral/eggshells etc, but only you can decide whether you want to do/spend that much etc? If you live somewhere that gets a lot of rain, then you can use rain water? Also, as JayC states, you need to know what you are using/adding to the water and aquarium, ie fertilizers, rocks. Unless you have very exotic plants you shouldn't need any fertilizers. Just as a note, we have come across quite a few experienced fish keeprs that have this sort of start off issues with shrimp. Shrimp are more difficult than fish, and the aquarium and water etc need to be ready and within the required parameters before getting the shrimps. Usually people jump in, get the shrimps before everything is ready/sorted. Hopefully though you will keep at it, or if this lot die you will have another go and we can help you get it sorted?
    • jayc
      These are all classic symptoms of shrimp moulting problems.   Again, another high GH symptom. High GH not only causes harder carapace (shell), but it also makes eggs harder. When the egg is harder the male finds it more difficult to fertilise the eggs.   That's a worry if you can't get a good GH reading because that is going to be most likely issue right now for you.   Because snails don't moult.    If you dont already have a TDS meter, I suggest getting one asap. It's another test to narrow down your water parameters, and not have to trust one test by it's own - in this case the GH test kit. I would wager your water parameter is too high in dissolved minerals - likely from the tap water source, fertiliser dosing and/or any rocks/crushed corals you might have in the tank. To remedy this, you need to start doing water changes with RO, distilled or rain water immediately. I would do a 50% water change with RO water asap. Then look for sources that increase GH in the tank and eliminate it - fertilisers, rocks, crush corals, shells.    It's difficult to save a shrimp who's carapace is already too hard, but hopefully any younger shrimps will benefit from the water change and the reduced GH.   Good luck and keep us updated.
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