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revolutionhope

Air-driven sponge-filters with space for media

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revolutionhope

Hey skfa,

 

I'm trying to get some tips and feedback on how people find these newer style of sponge filters are doing.

 

I know there are at least a couple of types of them available in australia and I am planning to shut down my canister filters and replace them with this style of filtration.

 

I'd love to know what are the potential negatives with these things. How reliable they are and ultimately i need to decide which model/make is the best quality one before I go ahead and purchase a bunch of them soon.

 

TIA

 

 

will

 

 

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Madmerv

Interested in following this one. Please post your opinions and the outcome/conclusion. 

 

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jayc

They work like other air sponge filters, except they give the extra benefit of additional biological filtration. It will never replace a canister filter in efficiency and capacity to filter a tank. But small nano tanks can get away with them. Given a choice of a normal sponge filter and a Biospon filter for a nano tank, you would pick the Biospon any day for the extra biological filtration. But for any tank larger than a nano, canisters are still hard to beat. 

 

Like any air driven sponge filters, they clog quickly, at least a lot quicker than canisters. Which means more maintenance.

If you like a tank that is free of clutter like cables, heaters, tubes, CO2 diffusers, etc, than adding a sponge filter of any sort is going to add to the clutter.  

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neo-2FX

You might find this topic an interesting read

Sponge filters are great for shrimp tanks especially the ones with media chambers for reasons stated above from jayc and because the shrimp feed off of the sponge.

I personally find them a bit of a pain to maintain and in future would probably stick to cannister.

I also get really nervous shoving my hands in the tank to take out the sponges to clean as I'm afraid of losing shrimplets or introducing some nasty chemicals, from my hands, unintentionally. 

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