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    • She11kat
      By She11kat
      My tank looks like it full of marine snow. I am not sure if it's a good or bad thing. I also have 5 or 6 tiny white worms flailing about in the water, they are maybe 1cm at most. My tank is plants only right now and it's been setup for 6-8 weeks. Should I be concerned? 


    • Zebra
      By Zebra
      Hello,
      Ive noticed I had some equipment laying around that needed to be put to better use, and after settling in my half a dozen or so new shrimp colonies and other tanks, I figure I'll get to scaling it. 
      Ive cleaned up an old 50cm Long tank and cut a glass brace for this light to sit on, Was a standard 3ft tropical PL compact flouro light, one ballast stopped working ages back so I cut it out and halved the unit,  and the other has powered along for over a year now with a new globe.
      I've Got that light 36w, my 1L Ista co2 bottle just behind it, Aquaone 650 canister filter- which I'm putting a glass skimmer on, a standard glass heater, and drop checker.- That's about it for equipment, I'm contemplating adding a sotching oxydator I bought from newbreed aquatics closing down sale.
      Looking for some nice lava rock as I want to keep the kh quite low in this one, most of my other tanks have had seiryu or something else reactive, and I find plants like anubias and buce grip much better into light pourous stone like lava rock. 
      I've got a fresh bag of Black earth to go in there when I do find the lava rock, till then.


    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Many aquatic keepers combine their passion for plants and shrimp in the one tank. One common question for newcomers is how to keep the shrimp safe in a planted tank that requires fertilizers. Why is this important? Well, how do you know what's safe, what's not, how it affects water parameters, what's not recommended, premixed liquid vs dry and the list goes on and on.
      One SKF Aquatics member, @Brentwillmers, found the following as a safe method for Taiwan Bee shrimp in his planted aquariums.
      Using only use R/O water with salty shrimp GH to a TDS of 80-90, the fertilizer dosing schedule is a mix of liquid and dry powders. This mix depends on availability and cost. Micro-Mix supplies a broad range of trace elements demonstrated to be necessary for proper plant health and growth.
      The following dosage of Micronutrients was found to be safe for his Taiwan Bee shrimp:
      Iron: 0.5ppm  Magnesium: 0.80ppm Zinc: 0.002ppm Manganese: 0.001ppm Boron: 0.002ppm Molybdenum: 0.003ppm Cobalt: 0.00002ppm For trace elements, Seachem Trace, Aquavitro envy or a dry powder using a product such as Plantex CSM+Boron can be used. Often people will choose to dose chelated iron separately from other trace elements, though most commercial trace mixes do include some level of chelated iron. For this reason, Aquavitro propel is preferred.
      However, with some micro-mixes be aware of the copper concentration as these can be fatal for your shrimp.
      Micro-nutrients can be used alone or in conjunction with a macro-nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Liquid Seachem Nitrogen can be used or a dry powder form via adding the compound Potassium Nitrate (KNO3). Try to keep the levels at around 10ppm in low, medium and high light aquariums. Do not exceed 20ppm!! If you do stop dosing and do a water change and test again. 
      Liquid Seachem Phosphorus or a powder form as Monopotassium Phosphate or KH2PO4 can be used in the aquarium but keep the levels low. It's best used in low, medium and high light aquariums and kept at around 0.5ppm. Always keep these levels low as possible it can be harmful to shrimp.
      Seachem Potassium or powdered potassium sulfate, or K2SO4 can be used. Keep the dose to around 10ppm in low to medium light aquarium and 20ppm with high light aquariums. Do not exceed 20ppm as it can be harmful to more sensitive shrimp.
      Dosing macro's 3 times per week and micro's 3 times a week alternating between days generally works well. You can find the perfect balance by dosing in the mornings and performing water test before lights out. On day 7 it’s important to do a water change, 50% weekly is recommended to reset water parameters. 
      Unfortunately, a 50% water change will cause TDS levels to fall quickly. One method to minimize the rate in reduction is to perform 2 lots of 30% water changes (morning and afternoon) instead of a single 50%. The PH of the new water should be as close to your aquarium PH as possible. TDS will increase again after each dose of fertilizers so keep this in mind when adding remineralization to R/O water. 
      Some methods of dosing are:
      Estimative Index (EI) Dosing Target Dosing PPS Pro Dosing EI method:
      EI dosing involves dosing each individual macro and a trace mix up to a high level throughout a week and at the end of the week, a 50% water change is performed, cutting the remaining nutrients in half, and the tank is dosed again. This is a simple way to insure you never bottom out on any nutrients. However, not a great idea for shrimp.
      Target Dosing (preferred method):
      Target dosing involves performing water tests on nitrate, potassium, phosphate and iron levels, dosing as per the target levels for your tank.
      PPS Pro Dosing:
      PPS Pro dosing involves dosing the tank with the amount of each nutrient needed during a 24-hour cycle. It requires daily dosing, but is great for keeping the tank from having excess nutrients which can cause algae issues. It does involve some math and some pretty small measurements, but is a very effective way to dose. 
      Whatever the dosing method, one key point to remember is that everything is dependent on CO2, lighting and plants. Hope you enjoyed this article and happy shrimping. 
       
      References and Content/Image Credit
      SKF Aquatics member - @Brentwillmers
       
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    • Healingeagle
      Planaria easy fix.  Panacur c Kills all worms and snails shrimp happily stay alive and unaffected. Simple easy fix. The thing is it takes a couple of months for it to completely be safe for snails again. Planaria will kill shrimp, they leave a toxic trail behind them that can paralyze the little shrimp allowing them to be worm food.
    • jayc
      Planaria eggs (or cocoon) are way too small to be seen. So a full tear down of the tank will definitely take care of them.  Just be careful with re-using anything from the old tank. Hardscape items can be boiled. Plants need to be treated. I've always used the mild bleach treatment. 1part bleach to 19parts water, and soak for 5 minutes. Rinse carefully before putting it back into a tank. I don't use bleach on anything porous like drift wood or sponge though.  The empty tank can be washed in white vinegar, rinse clean and let dry in the sun before using the tank.  
    • EBC
      Hope you feel better! Super keen to hear how the carbonated water approach works. Still need to find the hours I need to do a full tank tear down but planning on using carbonated water to treat the plants before they go back in. Hoping this manages to kill anything clinging to the plants. Anyone know what scud eggs are like? Looking it up, they seem to carry the eggs similar to shrimp so there shouldn't be any clinging to any driftwood or anything right? Also, I have some planaria in my tank as well (small that don't actually seem to bother the shrimp, not even the babies). Anyone know if there are eggs or anything that I need to worry about with them? Or should the full tear down and careful replacement of shrimp and plants take care of both?
    • Healingeagle
      I have had Fish in most all these tanks. I never seem to be able to get rid of them They never go away Fish tank herpies. Worse than duckweed. I have a couple tanks were there may be none, 10g planted tank with 3 kuli loaches in it for 4 or 5 years, and a thin sand empty tank with Corys in it those tanks the fish I suspect might have possibly done it, I bet on the scuds, resilient basterds. I'm buying sparkling water today. 
    • sdlTBfanUK
      The fish may work so that you don't even need to transfer the shrimp out to another tank, just remove the angel fish after say a week of not seeing any scud in each tank. You will have probably also lost any baby shrimp but you can rebuild on that from the adult shrimp left as long as the angel fish don't get large enough to eat those as well? If you see any big scuds you should still try and get those out manually if you can as even the fish may not be interested in those if the fish are small? I hope this works well for you. If you do transfer shrimp it is very unlikely the scuds would be on the shrimp, they are more likely to be caught in the net where they can be hard to spot if they are babies! Simon
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