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    • She11kat
      By She11kat
      My tank looks like it full of marine snow. I am not sure if it's a good or bad thing. I also have 5 or 6 tiny white worms flailing about in the water, they are maybe 1cm at most. My tank is plants only right now and it's been setup for 6-8 weeks. Should I be concerned? 


    • Zebra
      By Zebra
      Hello,
      Ive noticed I had some equipment laying around that needed to be put to better use, and after settling in my half a dozen or so new shrimp colonies and other tanks, I figure I'll get to scaling it. 
      Ive cleaned up an old 50cm Long tank and cut a glass brace for this light to sit on, Was a standard 3ft tropical PL compact flouro light, one ballast stopped working ages back so I cut it out and halved the unit,  and the other has powered along for over a year now with a new globe.
      I've Got that light 36w, my 1L Ista co2 bottle just behind it, Aquaone 650 canister filter- which I'm putting a glass skimmer on, a standard glass heater, and drop checker.- That's about it for equipment, I'm contemplating adding a sotching oxydator I bought from newbreed aquatics closing down sale.
      Looking for some nice lava rock as I want to keep the kh quite low in this one, most of my other tanks have had seiryu or something else reactive, and I find plants like anubias and buce grip much better into light pourous stone like lava rock. 
      I've got a fresh bag of Black earth to go in there when I do find the lava rock, till then.


    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Many aquatic keepers combine their passion for plants and shrimp in the one tank. One common question for newcomers is how to keep the shrimp safe in a planted tank that requires fertilizers. Why is this important? Well, how do you know what's safe, what's not, how it affects water parameters, what's not recommended, premixed liquid vs dry and the list goes on and on.
      One SKF Aquatics member, @Brentwillmers, found the following as a safe method for Taiwan Bee shrimp in his planted aquariums.
      Using only use R/O water with salty shrimp GH to a TDS of 80-90, the fertilizer dosing schedule is a mix of liquid and dry powders. This mix depends on availability and cost. Micro-Mix supplies a broad range of trace elements demonstrated to be necessary for proper plant health and growth.
      The following dosage of Micronutrients was found to be safe for his Taiwan Bee shrimp:
      Iron: 0.5ppm  Magnesium: 0.80ppm Zinc: 0.002ppm Manganese: 0.001ppm Boron: 0.002ppm Molybdenum: 0.003ppm Cobalt: 0.00002ppm For trace elements, Seachem Trace, Aquavitro envy or a dry powder using a product such as Plantex CSM+Boron can be used. Often people will choose to dose chelated iron separately from other trace elements, though most commercial trace mixes do include some level of chelated iron. For this reason, Aquavitro propel is preferred.
      However, with some micro-mixes be aware of the copper concentration as these can be fatal for your shrimp.
      Micro-nutrients can be used alone or in conjunction with a macro-nutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Liquid Seachem Nitrogen can be used or a dry powder form via adding the compound Potassium Nitrate (KNO3). Try to keep the levels at around 10ppm in low, medium and high light aquariums. Do not exceed 20ppm!! If you do stop dosing and do a water change and test again. 
      Liquid Seachem Phosphorus or a powder form as Monopotassium Phosphate or KH2PO4 can be used in the aquarium but keep the levels low. It's best used in low, medium and high light aquariums and kept at around 0.5ppm. Always keep these levels low as possible it can be harmful to shrimp.
      Seachem Potassium or powdered potassium sulfate, or K2SO4 can be used. Keep the dose to around 10ppm in low to medium light aquarium and 20ppm with high light aquariums. Do not exceed 20ppm as it can be harmful to more sensitive shrimp.
      Dosing macro's 3 times per week and micro's 3 times a week alternating between days generally works well. You can find the perfect balance by dosing in the mornings and performing water test before lights out. On day 7 it’s important to do a water change, 50% weekly is recommended to reset water parameters. 
      Unfortunately, a 50% water change will cause TDS levels to fall quickly. One method to minimize the rate in reduction is to perform 2 lots of 30% water changes (morning and afternoon) instead of a single 50%. The PH of the new water should be as close to your aquarium PH as possible. TDS will increase again after each dose of fertilizers so keep this in mind when adding remineralization to R/O water. 
      Some methods of dosing are:
      Estimative Index (EI) Dosing Target Dosing PPS Pro Dosing EI method:
      EI dosing involves dosing each individual macro and a trace mix up to a high level throughout a week and at the end of the week, a 50% water change is performed, cutting the remaining nutrients in half, and the tank is dosed again. This is a simple way to insure you never bottom out on any nutrients. However, not a great idea for shrimp.
      Target Dosing (preferred method):
      Target dosing involves performing water tests on nitrate, potassium, phosphate and iron levels, dosing as per the target levels for your tank.
      PPS Pro Dosing:
      PPS Pro dosing involves dosing the tank with the amount of each nutrient needed during a 24-hour cycle. It requires daily dosing, but is great for keeping the tank from having excess nutrients which can cause algae issues. It does involve some math and some pretty small measurements, but is a very effective way to dose. 
      Whatever the dosing method, one key point to remember is that everything is dependent on CO2, lighting and plants. Hope you enjoyed this article and happy shrimping. 
       
      References and Content/Image Credit
      SKF Aquatics member - @Brentwillmers
       


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    • Newday
      Hello, again.  I really appreciate everyone's wisdom on this topic.  Since I last posted, I lost my 29 gallon tropical freshwater aquarium to a sudden leak. 😞  Thankfully, I was able to save and rehome all the fish.  But, that means my 7 gallon shrimp tank received an upgrade wrt live plants and gravel.  I was hoping that would inspire some mating behavior, but I actually witnessed a female discharging what must be unfertilized eggs just this evening.  The male shrimp (I thought I had two, but now I'm questioning the other's sex after some weeks) is not doing his job and I can't figure out why.  I had to siphon out 50% of the water to move it from it's prior location beneath the 29 gallon.  I have not performed another water change in the nearly 3 weeks since the leak happened.  I check the parameters in the 7 gallon once a week and ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite are 0ppm.  Temp remains at a steady 72 degrees.  The shrimp are as active as ever but that male is unexcited by a tank full of females.  No clue what to do next.😑
    • DEL 707
      I'm thinking of ordering that "Salty Shrimp - Shrimp Mineral GH/KH+". My only concern is, does it also have all the needed minerals for my plants? Edit - If I was to use my tap water, what kind of GH should I be aiming for?
    • sdlTBfanUK
      WOW, that's hard water all right! Amazing how different it is to mine as probably only about 25 miles between us???? You were right to use RO water so at least you have a good starting point from here in! The PH may be the biggest issue as remineralising with a shrimp specific GH/KH+ will sort everything else with RO water. Cherry shrimps are pretty tough and adaptable so will tolerate PH below 7 but the nearer you can get to 7 the better, and a long time acclimating the shrimps using a dripper (there is a tube with regulator sold by ProShrimp for about £10 I think if you don't already have something) will be needed! The soil will take longer to loose its PH buffering ability with the RO though! There are a number of ways you can go from here: 1) RO water plus a GH/KH+ and try to get the PH up somehow although you will be fighting the Soil until that exhausts its buffering ability. 2) You could mix RO and (dechlorinated) tap water at 3:1 and then use a GH+. I do a 50/50 'similar' (half tap water, half brita filtered water) on my oldest tank. can't even remember why but I believe in 'don't try and fix it if it isn't broken' so have just carried on ever since. The mixed water would start at PH 6.2, TDS 70(ish), GH just over 4, KH just under 4 and then you can mineralise it (GH+ only) for the rest. This will exhaust the soil buffering quicker than 1 above and you will save a bit on RO water, use less (about half as much) mineraliser etc. You may think this is a bit too fussy a route though, and the soil will still buffer anyway, just not for as long as all RO water, and when it stops buffering you will have a PH closer to the ideal for the shrimps. Probably where you are now I would just get the snails for now until you have stopped adjusting the water or at least decided where next, probably not much longer before you get shrimps. I would also try turning off the CO2 and just see if it is really needed, if it looks like it is you can easily turn it back on then, but shrimps will do better without it and it MAY not be needed, same for fertilisers??? At least you are doing all this before getting the shrimps, very smart as most of us have learnt the hard/wrong way................ Simon
    • DEL 707
      Did some tests on my tap water. PH: 7.13 TDS: 274 KH: 15 GH: 17 Nothing out of the ordinary with the other test, nitrates were about 5ppm.
    • Cesar
      If you are comfortable with selling to hobbyist, try posting them for sale! https://skfaquatics.com/forum/forums/forum/148-selling-forum-livestock/ You can make a bit of money to buy MORE TANKS! 🙂  
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