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New Library Article - Planorbidae - Ramshorn Snails

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NoGi

large.IMG_9630.jpgPlanorbidae make up a significant portion of aquaitic pulmonate gastropods. In Australia alone, there are over 20 species group taxa that have been described. Their common name, ramshorn snails, comes from the spiral shape of their shells, which looks like a ram’s horn.

Ramshorn snails come in a wide range of colours, including red, brown and black, and they can even be shimmery and translucent in colour. Because of the unique design on their shells and their colour, they can be a welcomed addition to an aquarium, offering vibrant colour and interest. However, oftentimes, these snails inadvertently appear in aquariums, hitchhiking on the live plants and/or accessories that have been transferred from one tank to another. If there is enough food available, these snails can quickly breed and take over an aquarium; but, if they are properly maintained, they can be a welcomed addition, even if their presence was not intended. These snails eat food that is leftover in the water, dead plant material and algae, and as such, they can help to maintain the health and appearance of an aquarium.

Maintaining Ramshorn Snails

large.IMG_2174.JPG.43e32a3bef8e26a094a16b6a8bee7d27.JPGWhether you are interested in adding ramshorn snails to your aquarium or they have taken up residence unexpectedly and you decide that you want to keep them, it’s important to understand how to properly maintain them, which fortunately, is easy to do.

They do well in aquariums of various sizes. They are also very adaptable, which means that they can do well in various types of water conditions, though they prefer water that is filtered. Additionally, they do best in tanks that do not undergo sudden changes in their condition. These snails consume algae and food remnants from fish, but they prefer to eat dying and dead plant matter that is shed from live plants. They will also eat dead fish, shrimp or other snails.

 

Things to Avoid

If you are interested in maintaining Ramshorn snails in your aquarium, you should be aware that there are species of fish that will eat them. The most common predators of Ramshorn snails include bettas, loaches and dwarf puffer fish. Assassin snails will also prey on these snails.

Live Plants

large.IMG_6383.jpgSome people claim that Ramshorn snails destroy their live plants, while others have reported they do not cause any issues. However, in most cases, they do very little damage to live plants, but if a large amount of them are present and there are delicate plants in the aquarium, such as Water Sprite and Cabomba, they can do damage.

Behaviour

Ramshorn snails are peaceful and non-aggressive. They will not cause issues with fish, shrimp or other types of snails in an aquarium. They spend their time moving about the tank eating and adding interesting colour, texture and dimension to an aquarium.

References

Arctos. (n.d.). Retrieved May 7, 2017, from http://arctos.database.museum/name/Planorbidae 

Brown, D. S. (2001). Freshwater snails of the genus Gyraulus (Planorbidae) in Australia: taxa of the mainland. Molluscan Research, 21(1), 17-107. doi:10.1080/13235818.2001.10673736

large.IMG_2174.JPG.43e32a3bef8e26a094a16b6a8bee7d27.JPG Image credit - @Paul Minett

 

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Edited by jayc
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    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Melanoides tuberculata, commonly known as Malaysian Trumpet Snails (MTS), originated from all over Africa and Southern Asia. MTS are generally introduced into fish tanks accidentally by being attached to new plants or used aquarium decorations. They can come in a range of shapes, patterns and sizes. Opinions on MTS are divided with most having a strong dislike to them due to how quickly they breed and take over a tank. However, these snails can also be beneficial. As they move eating detritus and leftover food under the substrate, they are also aerating it. This in turn supports root growth and air exchange which are great in planted tanks.
      How Do They Breed
      Malaysian Trumpet Snails breed extremely fast, particularly in good tank conditions. The rapid breeding abilities of the MTS is one of the main reasons they are a concern to aquatic tank keepers. One method that works well with our members here is to use some vegetables like a sliced cucumber. Turn the lights off, wait a little while and remove. You can also limit their population growth by being strict with your feeding regime and removing any uneaten food from the tank. Take note though, without the use of a chemical deterrent, which is harmful to your other invertebrates, it will be unlikely that you can remove 100% of them.
      What Do They Eat
      They are not difficult to feed. Primarily, Malaysian Trumpet Snails consume large amounts of algae and detritus. They are also good scavengers – eating leftover food and fish waste as they burrow underneath the substrate; thus, doing their share of cleaning the tank. They are especially helpful to aquarists who collect messy freshwater fish, including goldfish, and who keeps live plants. No, MTS generally do not eat live plants. You can also supplement their diet by feeding them with leafy vegetables or any plant-based fish food. Just don’t overfeed them as this will cause a snail outbreak.
      Water Parameters
      These snails are not difficult to care for as they only require minimal attention. If the tank is good enough for your fish and/or shrimp, there is a good chance that it will be fine for them. That said, if you want to get technical, they should be kept in a freshwater tank range with the following water conditions:
      water temperature from 21° C to 26° C pH of 7.0 to 7.5 Sources:
      Vogler, R. E., Núñez, V., Gregoric, D. G., Beltramino, A. A., & Peso, J. G. (2012). Melanoides tuberculata: The history of an invader. Chapter, 3, 65-85.
        Image credit - @Paul Minett
       Image credit - Nogi

      View full article
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Melanoides tuberculata, commonly known as Malaysian Trumpet Snails (MTS), originated from all over Africa and Southern Asia. MTS are generally introduced into fish tanks accidentally by being attached to new plants or used aquarium decorations. They can come in a range of shapes, patterns and sizes. Opinions on MTS are divided with most having a strong dislike to them due to how quickly they breed and take over a tank. However, these snails can also be beneficial. As they move eating detritus and leftover food under the substrate, they are also aerating it. This in turn supports root growth and air exchange which are great in planted tanks.
      How Do They Breed
      Malaysian Trumpet Snails breed extremely fast, particularly in good tank conditions. The rapid breeding abilities of the MTS is one of the main reasons they are a concern to aquatic tank keepers. One method that works well with our members here is to use some vegetables like a sliced cucumber. Turn the lights off, wait a little while and remove. You can also limit their population growth by being strict with your feeding regime and removing any uneaten food from the tank. Take note though, without the use of a chemical deterrent, which is harmful to your other invertebrates, it will be unlikely that you can remove 100% of them.
      What Do They Eat
      They are not difficult to feed. Primarily, Malaysian Trumpet Snails consume large amounts of algae and detritus. They are also good scavengers – eating leftover food and fish waste as they burrow underneath the substrate; thus, doing their share of cleaning the tank. They are especially helpful to aquarists who collect messy freshwater fish, including goldfish, and who keeps live plants. No, MTS generally do not eat live plants. You can also supplement their diet by feeding them with leafy vegetables or any plant-based fish food. Just don’t overfeed them as this will cause a snail outbreak.
      Water Parameters
      These snails are not difficult to care for as they only require minimal attention. If the tank is good enough for your fish and/or shrimp, there is a good chance that it will be fine for them. That said, if you want to get technical, they should be kept in a freshwater tank range with the following water conditions:
      water temperature from 21° C to 26° C pH of 7.0 to 7.5 Sources:
      Vogler, R. E., Núñez, V., Gregoric, D. G., Beltramino, A. A., & Peso, J. G. (2012). Melanoides tuberculata: The history of an invader. Chapter, 3, 65-85.
        Image credit - @Paul Minett
       Image credit - Nogi
    • NoGi
      By NoGi
      Planorbidae make up a significant portion of aquaitic pulmonate gastropods. In Australia alone, there are over 20 species group taxa that have been described. Their common name, ramshorn snails, comes from the spiral shape of their shells, which looks like a ram’s horn.
      Ramshorn snails come in a wide range of colours, including red, brown and black, and they can even be shimmery and translucent in colour. Because of the unique design on their shells and their colour, they can be a welcomed addition to an aquarium, offering vibrant colour and interest. However, oftentimes, these snails inadvertently appear in aquariums, hitchhiking on the live plants and/or accessories that have been transferred from one tank to another. If there is enough food available, these snails can quickly breed and take over an aquarium; but, if they are properly maintained, they can be a welcomed addition, even if their presence was not intended. These snails eat food that is leftover in the water, dead plant material and algae, and as such, they can help to maintain the health and appearance of an aquarium.
      Maintaining Ramshorn Snails
      Whether you are interested in adding ramshorn snails to your aquarium or they have taken up residence unexpectedly and you decide that you want to keep them, it’s important to understand how to properly maintain them, which fortunately, is easy to do.
      They do will in aquariums of various sizes. They are also very adaptable, which means that they can do well in various types of water conditions, though they prefer water that is filtered. Additionally, they do best in tanks that do not undergo sudden changes in their condition. These snails consume algae and food remnants from fish, but they prefer to eat dying and dead plant matter that is shed from live plants. They will also eat dead fish, shrimp or other snails.
       
      Things to Avoid
      If you are interested in maintaining Ramshorn snails in your aquarium, you should be aware that there are species of fish that will eat them. The most common predators of Ramshorn snails include bettas, loaches and dwarf puffer fish. Assassin snails will also prey on these snails.
      Live Plants
      Some people claim that Ramshorn snails destroy their live plants, while others have reported they do not cause any issues. However, in most cases, they do very little damage to live plants, but if a large amount of them are present and there are delicate plants in the aquarium, such as Water Sprite and Cabomba, they can do damage.
      Behaviour
      Ramshorn snails are peaceful and non-aggressive. They will not cause issues with fish, shrimp or other types of snails in an aquarium. They spend their time moving about the tank eating and adding interesting colour, texture and dimension to an aquarium.
      References
      Arctos. (n.d.). Retrieved May 7, 2017, from http://arctos.database.museum/name/Planorbidae 
      Brown, D. S. (2001). Freshwater snails of the genus Gyraulus (Planorbidae) in Australia: taxa of the mainland. Molluscan Research, 21(1), 17-107. doi:10.1080/13235818.2001.10673736
       Image credit - @Paul Minett


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