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Brentwillmers
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Hi SKF members 

I have a question to ask for you seasoned shrimp veterans.  

I am planning to be away from my shrimp tanks for up to 3 weeks. I will have someone who can throw in some food every now and then but hasn't got the time or know how's of testing or water changes.

trying to plan ahead. This will be the first time I'm away for this long and starting to feel really uneasy about leaving them. 

I will have plenty of boss shrimp snow and barley pellets. Will also have RO water for top ups. Will do a water change before I leave and make sure I have enough water for a water change when I get back. 

What else should I or shouldn't do or prepare for. 

How can I ensure that the tanks will be stable for the time I'm away. 

Any info really appreciated. 

Thanks

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Just a bit of tank info
I have 3 X 26.5cm cube they have hob filtration, LED lights on timers. Heaters scorching oxydator mini's. Bits of mosses and ferns.
Tank 1) holding PRL's. water parameters are.
PH 6.4
GH 4
KH 1
NH3/4 0ppm
NO2/3 0ppm
TDS 112
Temp min 24 degrees.

Tank 2) fairly new 3 weeks since cycle completed holding CRS/CBS michlings.
PH 6.4
GH 4
KH 1
NH3/4 0ppm
NO2/3 0ppm
TDS 120
Temp min 24 degrees.

Tank 3) some PRL and BB
PH 6.8
GH 4
KH 1
NH3/4 0ppm
NO2/3 0ppm
TDS 80
Temp min 24 degrees.

All tanks have Alder cones and Indian almond leaves added.
RO water get re-mineralized with salty shrimp GH/KH





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Hi Brent

As a general rule the biggest problem you will have is the shrimp sitter will over feed the shrimp and there will be a nitrate increase and algae outbreak.

Shrimp can and will survive on a lot less than we generally feed them so make sure the sitter is clear on the quantity to put in and to only feed, at the most 2 times a week. Also make it clear that sometimes shrimp die and they need to be removed asap to prevent a massive spike. They have to actually look in the tank regularly to check for this.

As there is going to be a nitrate increase without WC's while you are away reduce your light times before going to mitigate algae growth.

Things should be fine for that time period so dont worry about problems until they actually happen and have a stress free time away.

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Thanks Madmev for the info.
I will make sure she got it when it comes to feeding and removal of dead shrimp.
Will change the timers on the lighting.


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Brent,

One thing I've done when being away and having another person feed......unsure if they have medication boxes like this your way but was helpful to ensure that overfeeding did not occur.  I purchased one for each tank and only filled the days I wanted shrimp fed and only in the amounts I decided.  

s-l1000.jpg

Edited by Shrimple minded
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What an awesome idea. Will definitely do this.
Thanks Shrimple minded.


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  • 1 month later...

I have done the same as Shrimp Le minded but used a box that I bought from Kmart like a fish and tackle box (organiser) is what they sell it as and wrote the days for feeding on it simaler to the md box works great ???

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  • 4 years later...

Hi Brent! Maybe you should find a reliable person who will look after your shrimp while away? Because no matter how well you set everything up, there may be a failure, and you need someone who will notice it in time. Besides, I wanted to ask you where exactly are you going? I recommend avoiding dangerous countries such as Uganda and others if on vacation. Really safe place, with a 90 safety index for everyone who goes on vacation, can be found in the USA and European countries. Think about it

Edited by doritadaskam
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