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Shr1mpie

Do Shrimp actually need a light to breed?

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Shr1mpie

So, I am wanting to breed my Cherry Shrimp, and I have everything down packed apart from one thing, do they really need a light? So when doing research I usually read, but I decided to watch a video on breeding cherry shrimp, I had everything correct (apart from a heater, debatable), but it said you need a light, this is a problem, because I am planing on keeping Java Moss in the tank, but Java Moss doesn't like full light 24/7, so, the guy said that male shrimp need the light to see and identify the female shrimp to be able to breed, is this true?

Any info will help a lot! Thanks!

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anthonyd

The guy who did the video doesnt have a clue about shrimps ???

Shrimps can breed in the dark.

There is so much rubbish on shrimp keeping on the internet, it is scary ?

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glenn

Yeah cherry shrimp breed like rabbitts. A normal tropical setup is fine. I started with about 12 in a community tank and would have 80 or more now. Java moss is good to have, also an area of smooth river stones for them to hide in. My river stones are about thumbnail size.

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Shr1mpie

@anthonyd @glenn Thanks! I thought it was a little strange that shrimps need light, okay, well thank you! And I will get some smooth stone for them :)

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jayc

The only reason they might "NEED" light is as a que to the change in seasons. Unless the tank is in a room that's is in complete darkness, they should have sufficient light from a nearby window.

Plants definitely NEED light. We need lights to admire the shrimp. But shrimps can do without artficial aquarium tank lights for breeding. During breeding they follow pheromones from the moulted female rather than from sight. They can see other females but only go to the one that is berried and has moulted. Ever see the Male swimming around like crazy as if looking for something during mating?

Most often this act is carried out at dawn. Mostly. So all you need is a distinctive day/night cycle. So a tank that gets any light from a nearby window will also be enough.

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glenn

I have RCS living happily albeit at the bottom of the food chain. Their ability to breed withstands the regular predators that snack on them.

 

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Shr1mpie

@glenn @jayc Awesome, thanks for the info! I have a window in the room that the tank is in, so they will definitely be getting natural light and a consistent daylight cycle.

Wow Glenn, awesome photos!

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Zoidburg

I'm not sure why any tank requires 24/7 lighting unless you have a lot of light to grow algae intentionally...

 

Make sure that the tank gets indirect light, otherwise you may have an algae problem in the tank.

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Shr1mpie

@Zoidburg Yep, the tank won't be having direct light in it all the time.

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