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DIY co2 done the right way.


Zebra
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Hello,

So I made this little tank and stand a few weeks back to go in my shed.

It gets way to hot in here to have a normal co2 cylinder and I don't have a spare one floating around anyway, but I have lots of bits and pieces,

So I made this:

 

The reactor, Filter, night time shut off and proper needle valve to ensure the co2 level is constant and never rises.

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A diy wooden diffuser I made producing very fine pollen style bubbles.

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The only thing I would add if I could is a pressure relief valve, you can buy cheap kits off eBay that have one of these and a gauge, but this system doesn't seem to need it.

Im also using a recipe I adapted from mycology research utilising sugars with more complex carbohydrates to give a more stable long term reaction, I started this recipe on the 28th of dec and it's still going strong.

I had to remove the built in check valve from the other side of my needle valve (cause it's made for high pressure) it prevented co2 running to the diffuser at start up, and caused pressure to build up. I just used a standard air line check valve that requires less pressure to open and it's all working fine again. Atleast now I know standard airline push fittings hold up under the pressure, literally. I have used proper co2 tubing throughout, it's probably not needed considering this is a "constant" system but I had it laying around.

The the solenoid valve which runs my "night time shut off" operates a bit different to a standard pressurised co2 system.

I designed my solenoid on a T to the main line, It opens at night just venting co2 into the air instead of running into the tank, this is so pressure doesn't build up and wreck the whole system. 

My fav part is the diffuser TBH,

I'm so fascinated by wooden diffusers.

enjoy.

Edited by Zebra
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Haha not sure yet mate, I'll see how it tastes when it stops producing co2 lol

Maybe add some lemon next time.

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Update:

Im emptying and refilling the fermentation chamber tonight.

Its still producing decent co2 but has just started dropping off today, so I'm just gonna refill it, 

It lasted from the 28th Dec till now which I think is pretty good. 

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@KeenShrimp I tasted a bit before I made the new batch haha, 

It was highly alcoholic, just tasted like kind of sour beer, I don't think it would be too hard to make it taste decent haha.

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  • 11 months later...

Nice! I would wrap my bottle with a towel as I found that more CO2 was produced when the bottle is kept warm... Fermentation of the yeast and sugar slows down with colder temps, later I found a bottle with zipper neoprene cover and I modified the top to fit an airline...

As far as diffusion, I would just stick the other end of the airline straight into the Fluval intake, the intake propeller would dice up the bubbles and infusion would happen in the canister filter...

HTH

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