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    • Seattleshrimp
      By Seattleshrimp
      Hi ! 
      I live in Seattle where the water is incredibly soft and I have a tap water pH of 6.7, GH of 0-1 and KH 2. My existing tank with plants already has buffered substrate. Would I have better chance of keeping CRS than RCS with my current water parameters ? Or would RCS do okay?    I do have an RO system already, and I could  remineralize my water with salty shrimp KH/GH+. Which would allow my GH and KH parameter to be okay for neocaridinas, but I already have a tank with active substrate. I’m 100% I don’t have space to set up another tank with inert substrate.    Would do you recommend ? What are pH you have successfully kept neocaridinas and have them thriving ?    Thanks ! I appreciate all the help as I am new to the hobby. 
    • edishrimp
      By edishrimp
      Hey guys!
      I've had my CRS for close to a month now (bought about 20 juvies and adults on 30th June) and they seem to be really happy and healthy in their tank with the painted fire reds. So far the PFRs have been berrying and breeding like crazy but I've yet to see any berried CRS ?
      Tank Parameters:
      Size: 14 Gallon Long Ammonia , Nitrite 0ppm Nitrate 20ppm pH 6.3 dKH 2 dGH 7 TDS 170 Temp 23-25c Diet: Bacter AE (1 scoop once a week-mainly for the PFR babies), Bornoewild Frenzy (once a week), Indian Almond leaves and aldercones for when they get the late night hunger pangs ?
      So my question would be, do my CRS require some additional protein in their diet? I've been told breeding is quite a energy intensive activity for shrimp. And if so, would feeding some frozen blood-worms help to supplement this? 
      Thanks for reading!!
    • TheKeeper
      By TheKeeper
      So I currently have a 6 gallon planted tank that has been set up and running for 3 weeks. Im about to purchase my red cherry shrimp to put in this tank. There is plenty of algae in the tank for them to eat, so food should be fine for the beginning correct? Plus it is heavily planted meaning there is plenty of organic matter to be consumed at all times, so they shouldn't really need to be fed ever? Also i see that drip acclimation is best for getting them used to there new home. If i did this till the tank is half empty for provided them with as close conditions as possible without emptying the tank. Am i good to just refill the tank afterward or from now on when i do water changes do they all need to be dripped in? Also is it true that adding calcium to the tank is beneficial for the shrimp to molt?
      Im a pretty experienced fish keeper, just haven't ever had with shrimp so I dont want to kill all these expensive shrimps due to lack on knowledge. Any more knowledge or advice that can be given to me is high encouraged, even if it seems simple. 
      Some specs of the tank, tanks does have a filter, that has small openings that could suck up baby shrimp. Its a small filter and has algae growth on the openings so it really does reduce the flow a bit, where i dont see it becoming a  huge issue. The tank is co2 injected, but thats pretty nailed down so nuking them with co2 is highly unlikely. The tank has a soil bottom capped with coarse sand. The vast majority of the bottom of the tank is carpeted with plants but they still have a way to go. There is no lid on the top of the tank. The tank does have some natural river stones in it with the brown algae growth on them. And a lot of the plants have the white "bugger" algae growing on them or around them. The tank receives about 10 hours of light a day. I know i put a lot of un-important information here, but maybe a pro will see a problem here and be able to inform me so I can correct it. Thanks for your time and consideration in advance!!!!
      Regards
      -The Keeper
    • SquaniceandSquilliam
      By SquaniceandSquilliam
      Hi I'm an animal enthusiast with many frogs snakes and arachnids but it's my first attempt at caring for cherry shrimp..i researched with my girlfriend quite a bit and already set up a planted tank in a nano 2.6gallon aquarium. It will be cycling and until then I just wanted some feedback on how it looks and what y'all think about it? Thankyou ~ 

    • EBC
      By EBC
      Hi everyone, 
      I have been having a slow die off of my CRS over the last few of months. I am fairly new to this so I am not sure how to deal with this. 
      Tank: 28L
      Substrate: Fluval shrimp stratum (buffered to ~6.5)
      Current GH: 5
      KH: 0
      Temperature: 22 C
      Ammonia, nitrates, nitrites: ~0 ppm
      Bit of background:
      I started with 12 juvenile shrimp that I bought off a breeder in February this year. I started off using tap water (treated) with no problems. I got my first two berried females at the beginning of May. To this point I had had no deaths. At the beginning of June I had a couple (2) of deaths that I am still not sure the cause of. GH was low (2) at this time as I hadn't been testing for it, so that may have been the cause. Following those deaths I got some shrimp specific gh booster (saltyshrimp mineral GH+) and things seemed to recover. Berried females' eggs hatched at the beginning of June. One female became berried again in July. 
      Now the tank was a bit overgrown at this stage so it was hard to keep tabs on the shrimp. I didn't notice any more deaths until a recent move. Before moving the tank I removed a lot of the overgrown plants. Once getting it to the new place I only saw 6 shrimp (2 females, 4 male) so it seems there were a few lost between June and August. There was one small shrimp in there as well (seems the only baby who survived). 
      Since the move there was one death shortly after getting the tank set up. I chalked this one up to stress from the move. I haven't seen the baby shrimp since the second or so day after the move so I suspect that it has died as well. More recently I had a female die (at least I think it asa  female). See the first picture below. I noticed one day that she was behaving strangely. My shrimp haven't gone up to ride the floating frogbit since the first month I had them but a few days ago I noticed one up there. I went and had a look and she was just standing there. I also noticed that she seemed to be missing her long antennae. I snapped the below photo and went to work. When I got home, she was still there in the exact same spot. A few hours later, she was on the ground lying on her side. I poked at her and it was clear she was almost dead. Once I was sure she was dead, I removed her immediately. I did a test of the water and all parameters were good except pH which was high (around 7.2). Seems my buffered substrate had run out of buffering capacity due to the use of high PH tap water. I added some fresh substrate and did a water change with RO water and the pH is back to 6.5. Water change was done over the course of the day 1 litre at a time to avoid rapid swings in parameters. 
      My berried female was still doing well and her eggs hatched two days ago. She was active and seemed healthy the next day. Today I noticed her in the corner tipped over and not moving much. I snapped the below photo. I know the colour of the internal organs are meant to be a sign of bacterial infection, but I don't know what to really look for in a CRS. The colour in the second photo below looks odd to me. All limbs and antennae intact.
      EDIT: Just checked and the shrimp is dead. Anything I can do to try to determine the cause before I dispose of it?
      I am just at a loss at this stage. I feel like a bad shrimp keeper and I don't know what else to do. 
      Does this look/sound like a bacterial infection to you? What can I do to fix this?
      Thanks for your help and let me know if you need any more info!


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    • sdlTBfanUK
      Welcome fellow UK shrimp keeper! I would think it would be better to remove the shrimp into the quarantine tank and keep them there whilst you treat the fish in the main tank and once you finish treating the tank and fish do a complete water change (maybe 2 a week apart for safety) before returning the shrimps. That would seem the best option though obviously the shrimp would need to be in the separate tank for weeks. I'm not aware of any medications available for ICH that won't kill shriimp and/or snails. With neocaridina they probably will just about survive 30 degrees but you are pushing it close to the limit! I don't believe ich affects shrimps.
    • ferret-confirmed
      Re-posting here from The Shrimp Spot forum as I need help. Help, 40 litre tank has a ich (ichthyophtyirius multifiliis) / white spot outbreak. We've been able to separate the few surviving neon tetra into an emergency quarantine tank, with appropriate medicine for the fish. We had done this as we had noticed the issue practically too late as we miss identified the white spots as cotton mouth (which the tetra also have). We luckily quarantined the fish from the tank as  the ich reached its second stage as most have matured and abandoned the fish. This has become an issue as even if the neon tetra do not survive the treatment, I cannot re-add them to the tank and I don't want to keep the tank's environment full of parasites. Thankfully ich seem to not be able to effect the shrimp but the medicine we have for them is toxic to the shrimp and the plants in the tank, hence the separating of the neon tetra. I was wondering if there was anything I can do to the tank while the shrimp are still in the tank, as removing them isn't a viable option. We've been trying to get the temp of the tank to 30C and leaving it at that temp for an hour, however the tank's heater is verry slow and doesn't seem to be going up past 27C. From what I've searched 30C should kill of the ich without irritating the bloody mary shrimp too much (too many websites vary their recommended temp, so I wouldn't keep it above 28C long if we were able to get it that high) If anyone knows if there are any ich treatments or methods of killing ich that are safe for invertebrates and potentially plants I would love if they could suggest one.
    • Moul1974
      For beginners and smaller tanks, I recommend glass aquariums because of their affordability and scratch resistance. For larger, more advanced aquariums, we recommend acrylic because it's lighter and easier to repair than glass.
    • becky
      Hooray! I was hoping it was molt but he hasnt progressed at all in about a week. Thank you guys so much for your help again. Ill keep an eye out. 
    • jayc
      It looks like the shrimp is about to moult.  I don't keep Ghost shrimp, so I'm not too familiar with how they look when going into a moult. But the white band along each joint is common in other shrimp when they start to moult.
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