Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
pmasa

Rescaping an existing tank

Recommended Posts

pmasa

Hi all,

I have to move my tank in about a months time, and want to rescape the tank considering it will already be drained. I want to change the substrate from an inert gravel to ADA amazonia owing to the fact i want to grow some more plants/get a carpet going. 

I have read online that amazonia will produce amonia for weeks after it's addition to a tank. Not wanting to harm the inhabitants  (neons and RCS) i was thinking that i would try and cycle the soil in a separate container first and then add it to the tank, what are people's thoughts on this?

The tank is fully cycled (60l) with a ehiem 2215 filter.

Thanks in advance for the advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madmerv

Hey Pmasa.

I'm no expert on this but i will throw in my 2c worth and start the conversation.

Any sub you put in the tank that has fertilizing properties will leach to the water column for a while as the water passes over and through the surface layers. To try and cycle a sub until it stops leaching would be to remove all the goodness from the soil and make it as inert as your existing gravel. 

Is what you really want to be doing is pick up the level of cycled bacteria in your existing filter and tank setup to be able to cope with the increased ammonia expected when the new sub goes in. This way the initial spike can be taken care of as it happens and processed to Nitrate immediately.

How to do this without stressing your livestock is another matter. My first thoughts would be to get hold of a second filter, seed it from the one you have, then run it in a bucket with a really high (4ppm) ammonia level for the next month to get the max amount of bacteria in there. Constant water changes would be needed and close monitoring to make sure the nitrate level does not stall the cycle. Then do the sub change in the tank and add the new filter as well as the 2215 and that should take care of any spikes.

Another option would be to increase the ammonia in the tank with just the 2215 to increase the bacteria in it but i dont know how to do this safely.

Hope that gives you something to go on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pmasa

Thanks for the thoughts madmerv, i currently have a second filter in the tank that i had being meaning to remove so that could be some use... i am wondering if it might be worth putting the livestock in a container with my small filter for a couple of days and hope the canister deals with the worst of it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madmerv

Just like cycling a new tank i think the ammonia bacteria will get there pretty quick but the Nitrite bacteria need a few weeks to build up. Those in the know would be able to tell you how much ammonia Amazonia will leach and for how long.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • travellife
      By travellife
      Just received a new Fluval Flex 9 gallon which I'll be using for my Neocardina Davidi var. orange shrimpettes.  They are currently in a 1-1/2 gallon vase jarrarium with Aquasolum by Aquavitro substrate, live plants, no heater or filtration.  I have leftover Aquasolum substrate which I'm thinking of using again, either as a base substrate with sand or gravel cap or just by itself like I did in the jarrarium.  The reason I'm considering a cap is it's difficult to plant in and the cap could help with that.  I see Black Diamond sandblasting sand is popular but not eager about buying a 50lb bag and having to store the leftovers.  Or, just capping with regular old black gravel from the pet store.  I'm leaning towards using it by itself cause I'm not sure how a cap would look on the round Aquasolum pellets plus it is what the shrimp are used to, they were born in the vase.  Any suggestions from you pros much appreciated, this is my 1st foray into raising shrimp. 
      Here are some pics of their existing setup:  Shrimp Jarrarium Album
    • Anthony Rae
      By Anthony Rae
      BACKGROUND
      I have been keeping fish and aquatic plants for nearly 300 years now and have been blessed with a wonderful career in Horticulture. When planted tanks were popularised by the work of Amano, I started looking at various aquarium related forums to see what sort of information was available to hobbyists. It didn't take long to see that most of this was based on the opinions of aquarists who had achieved some success growing plants. Much of it was contradictory and I saw lots of talk about deficiencies, dosing of individual elements, misdiagnosis of problems and expensive mistakes. There didn't seem to be much of an organised approach to growing aquatic plants and there was a real need for reliable answers to the problems facing beginners in the hobby. For me it came to a head when my good friends, Billy and Victor opened Aquaristic Aquarium Gallery. Their mission was to provide top quality products, great customer service, inspiration and of course, to make lots of money.
      THE REALITY
      They stocked the best and most popular substrates, amendments, fertilizers, lighting and CO2 injection technology.They also set up display tanks to show their clients what they could expect from the various products in stock. Despite the wonderful results obtained in their shop, it became apparent that there was no simple way to prepare their clients for the problems they would face in the attempt to produce a lovely nature aquarium. One such problem was to find a substrate that could be used by a novice without the pitfalls of ammonia spikes, melting plants, algal blooms and cloudiness when disturbing the substrate.
      THE ANSWER
      Billy asked me if it was possible to develop a media he could happily recommend to his clients, confident that they would have a positive experience. I felt sure that with sufficient yelling, name calling and arguing, this could be done. So here we are, 2 years later, well tested by his experienced friends, ready to flood the market with SMARTSOIL.
      WHAT IS IT?
      SMARTSOIL is a balanced blend of high quality Clay, Peat, Sand and some secret amendments of my own which do not cause cancer, infertility or death in fish, inverts or humans.
      SMARTSOIL addresses the problems that can cause headaches, mentioned above.
      SMARTSOIL is sold in bags of approx 2 litres, sufficient for a standard 60cm tank.
      HOW DO YOU USE IT?
      First,you spread the SMARTSOIL evenly over the tank floor, covering only the areas to be planted.
      If you are very particular, you can spray this layer with a fine mist of water, press it gently and leave it overnight to harden. This step is useful to professionals who cannot afford to risk murky water when they fill a clients tank.
      Then you spread at least 5cm of the sand or gravel of your choice and carefully fill the tank with water. Unlike other media, you are not obliged to thickly plant your tank from day one. I find it best to simply leave things alone.
      DO NOT DOSE ANY FERTILIZER FOR AT LEAST A MONTH!!
      The SMARTSOIL will absorb any excess ammonia during the settling period. It contains enough ferts to support growth for at least a month without burning plants or causing algal blooms. If you wish to move plants around, some clay will be stirred up but the cloudiness will quickly settle.
      SMARTSOIL is a long term choice and will last longer as an effective media than any of the soils I have trialed.
      Shrimp friendly too.
      Thanks for reading
      AR

      View full article
    • Anthony Rae
      By Anthony Rae
      BACKGROUND
      I have been keeping fish and aquatic plants for nearly 300 years now and have been blessed with a wonderful career in Horticulture. When planted tanks were popularised by the work of Amano, I started looking at various aquarium related forums to see what sort of information was available to hobbyists. It didn't take long to see that most of this was based on the opinions of aquarists who had achieved some success growing plants. Much of it was contradictory and I saw lots of talk about deficiencies, dosing of individual elements, misdiagnosis of problems and expensive mistakes. There didn't seem to be much of an organised approach to growing aquatic plants and there was a real need for reliable answers to the problems facing beginners in the hobby. For me it came to a head when my good friends, Billy and Victor opened Aquaristic Aquarium Gallery. Their mission was to provide top quality products, great customer service, inspiration and of course, to make lots of money.
      THE REALITY
      They stocked the best and most popular substrates, amendments, fertilizers, lighting and CO2 injection technology.They also set up display tanks to show their clients what they could expect from the various products in stock. Despite the wonderful results obtained in their shop, it became apparent that there was no simple way to prepare their clients for the problems they would face in the attempt to produce a lovely nature aquarium. One such problem was to find a substrate that could be used by a novice without the pitfalls of ammonia spikes, melting plants, algal blooms and cloudiness when disturbing the substrate.
      THE ANSWER
      Billy asked me if it was possible to develop a media he could happily recommend to his clients, confident that they would have a positive experience. I felt sure that with sufficient yelling, name calling and arguing, this could be done. So here we are, 2 years later, well tested by his experienced friends, ready to flood the market with SMARTSOIL.
      WHAT IS IT?
      SMARTSOIL is a balanced blend of high quality Clay, Peat, Sand and some secret amendments of my own which do not cause cancer, infertility or death in fish, inverts or humans.
      SMARTSOIL addresses the problems that can cause headaches, mentioned above.
      SMARTSOIL is sold in bags of approx 2 litres, sufficient for a standard 60cm tank.
      HOW DO YOU USE IT?
      First,you spread the SMARTSOIL evenly over the tank floor, covering only the areas to be planted.
      If you are very particular, you can spray this layer with a fine mist of water, press it gently and leave it overnight to harden. This step is useful to professionals who cannot afford to risk murky water when they fill a clients tank.
      Then you spread at least 5cm of the sand or gravel of your choice and carefully fill the tank with water. Unlike other media, you are not obliged to thickly plant your tank from day one. I find it best to simply leave things alone.
      DO NOT DOSE ANY FERTILIZER FOR AT LEAST A MONTH!!
      The SMARTSOIL will absorb any excess ammonia during the settling period. It contains enough ferts to support growth for at least a month without burning plants or causing algal blooms. If you wish to move plants around, some clay will be stirred up but the cloudiness will quickly settle.
      SMARTSOIL is a long term choice and will last longer as an effective media than any of the soils I have trialed.
      Shrimp friendly too.
      Thanks for reading
      AR
    • Anthony Rae
      By Anthony Rae
      One of the biggest headaches for planted tank enthusiasts is choosing the right substrate. There is no 'best' substrate as each has advantages and disadvantages. So let's take a look at what is available.
      NATURAL SAND AND GRAVEL
      Inert sand and gravel can make a perfectly good starting point for any aquarist. My favourite quartz sand is from the Nepean River. Never use beach sand, always river sand. Fine rooted plants like Hc and Hairgrass will grow easily in sand. Their roots are able to make a tight grip in sand and in nature, they are usually found growing on the fine, silty edges of creeks and pools.
      When choosing a gravel, go for a grain size around 2-4mm as this will allow roots to grow freely and also allow water to circulate through the root zone.
      Quartz gravel is a good choice for people wanting to use Undergravel filters as it will not break down over time and clog the filter. Baby fish and shrimp will not get caught in these filters and cleaning with a gravel filter then topping with clean water achieves a water change and filter clean at the same time. Amendments such as Laterite are also suitable to provide food directly to the roots. The addition of Marble Chip will help avoid problems with Vallisneria, Swordplants, Aponogetons and most of the Cryptocorynes.
      If you are planning to use only Mosses and Ferns, Natural Gravel is possibly the best choice.
      MANUFACTURED SUBSTRATES
      These are designed to provide a good media for heavily planted tanks. When you choose a brand of soil, I suggest you stick with the same brand of amendments and fertilizers since these are designed to compliment the substrate. People using these substrates will often spend a lot of time dosing, testing and adjusting their tanks. Good lighting and CO2 injection are necessary to achieve the best results.
      DIY SUBSTRATES
      Many people these days like to mix their own substrates. Diana Walstad has written articles and books with her findings on home made mixes. Well worth reading her material if you want to have a go. There is also a trend for some of the better aquarium outlets to provide their own specialty mix.
      One of these is SMARTSOIL, designed by aquarists to make planted tanks easy. SMARTSOIL will help prevent ammonia spike during set-up and contains a flocculant to avoid cloudy water when disturbing the substrate.
      I welcome comments and positive input to the comments I have made here.
      AR

      View full article
    • Anthony Rae
      By Anthony Rae
      One of the biggest headaches for planted tank enthusiasts is choosing the right substrate. There is no 'best' substrate as each has advantages and disadvantages. So let's take a look at what is available.
      NATURAL SAND AND GRAVEL
      Inert sand and gravel can make a perfectly good starting point for any aquarist. My favourite quartz sand is from the Nepean River. Never use beach sand, always river sand. Fine rooted plants like Hc and Hairgrass will grow easily in sand. Their roots are able to make a tight grip in sand and in nature, they are usually found growing on the fine, silty edges of creeks and pools.
      When choosing a gravel, go for a grain size around 2-4mm as this will allow roots to grow freely and also allow water to circulate through the root zone.
      Quartz gravel is a good choice for people wanting to use Undergravel filters as it will not break down over time and clog the filter. Baby fish and shrimp will not get caught in these filters and cleaning with a gravel filter then topping with clean water achieves a water change and filter clean at the same time. Amendments such as Laterite are also suitable to provide food directly to the roots. The addition of Marble Chip will help avoid problems with Vallisneria, Swordplants, Aponogetons and most of the Cryptocorynes.
      If you are planning to use only Mosses and Ferns, Natural Gravel is possibly the best choice.
      MANUFACTURED SUBSTRATES
      These are designed to provide a good media for heavily planted tanks. When you choose a brand of soil, I suggest you stick with the same brand of amendments and fertilizers since these are designed to compliment the substrate. People using these substrates will often spend a lot of time dosing, testing and adjusting their tanks. Good lighting and CO2 injection are necessary to achieve the best results.
      DIY SUBSTRATES
      Many people these days like to mix their own substrates. Diana Walstad has written articles and books with her findings on home made mixes. Well worth reading her material if you want to have a go. There is also a trend for some of the better aquarium outlets to provide their own specialty mix.
      One of these is SMARTSOIL, designed by aquarists to make planted tanks easy. SMARTSOIL will help prevent ammonia spike during set-up and contains a flocculant to avoid cloudy water when disturbing the substrate.
      I welcome comments and positive input to the comments I have made here.
      AR


  • Join Our Community!

    Register today, ask questions and share your shrimp and fish tank experiences with us!

  • Posts

    • Lizzy
      Some photos I took yesterday
    • jayc
      Springs here, so maybe the shrimp are more active for breeding? Hope you are collecting the waste RO water for watering your plants.
    • Lizzy
      Bought an RO DI unit from FSA. Free postage and it arrived in 2 days. Very happy. The TDS pen arrived today so I got busy. For reference, I’m about 2 hours North of Sydney. Tap water: TDS 155-157. PH 7-7.2 RO water: TDS 0-1 (Remineralised to 150). PH 6.6 CRS tank water: TDS 198. PH 7-7.2 I siphoned a vey small amount of tank water and am in the process of drip feeding the RO water into the tank. I’ll do this method during water changes until the tank water PH is at 6.6 I guess.  Also found new born shrimplets yesterday and two more berried females. I haven’t seen any berried in about a month so I’m happy.
    • jayc
      But the shrimp will be thinking otherwise. Look at all that yummy brown diatom!
    • jayc
      I am old school like that too. I prefer the classics patterns/colours. And I try very hard to not create further hybrids. I want my CRS to be CRS. My tigers to be tigers. etc...   @kms, all the more to support the site and sign up as a paid member.   @Cesar, what's the deal now with the new forum update? Has the photo size limits been changed, and if so what is the max for regular members?
×
×
  • Create New...