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Kurobom

Shrimp Macro Photography

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Kurobom

Hi everyone! I'm usually lurking on the website, but I'm a big fan of this forum and the great information it has. I hope this helps express my gratitude to you all! I recently wrote an article on shrimp macro photography for Photography Life, and they published it! I hope you enjoy :)

https://photographylife.com/aquarium-macro-photography-of-ornamental-shrimp

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Madmerv

Wow. Amazing photo's and a really good article.

Welcome to the site.

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jc12

Stunning photos! Read your article and checked out your website. Very impressive photos, not only limited to the shrimp related ones. Welcome to SKF and thank you for sharing.

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zn30

Beautiful shots, love the pic of the molt stands out in the crowd of many other impressive shrimp shots. Well done thanks for sharing.

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buck

amazing pics dude, feel free to share as many as you want! its like shrimp porn ?

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dash77

That was an awsome read, love those pics and? I'm off to buy a camera lol

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neo-2FX

??

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kizshrimp

Great photos and article mate! 

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Kurobom

Thank you so much for the encouraging and kind words everyone! I'm currently stashing my photos on http://steven-chan.smugmug.com/ if you guys want to see more pics. 

Looks like I can't upload that many pics at a time in one post! I just got my sensor cleaned and did some test shots a few hours ago. Enjoy! DSC_3530.jpg

 

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zn30

@Kurobom wow nice stash, love the photos well done and thanks.

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NoGi
1 hour ago, Kurobom said:

Looks like I can't upload that many pics at a time in one post! I just got my sensor cleaned and did some test shots a few hours ago. Enjoy!

As soon as you get a few more posts up it should let you post more.

Great pics btw

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Kurobom

Good to know! And thank you :) It makes taking the pics and sharing them that much more enjoyable! I will try to post more so that I can get more pics out to y'all!

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