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Madmerv

Wow

I've had to type, delete, and re type this several times.

I'm still having trouble toning this down to acceptable levels. Ignorance of the law is no excuse for committing a crime and ignorance of the damage done by introduced species is why we have laws.

We have have waterways at every temp there is from 3C alpine streams to 32c Kimberly ones. All of them have native species living in them and all of them could be adversely affected by an introduced species.Even experts on this subject have trouble predicting what can go wrong.

Please do just a little bit of research, google it, on the destruction to native Australian waterways and wildlife from introduced species that were thought to be harmless.

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fishmosy
1 hour ago, Mitch91 said:

Well first sure cherry shrimp could yes. But what damage would they cause they would only become a good source.  Second CRS ect would not survive our water temps at all. Rabbits and cane toads are different they can put up with tolerances 

Cherry shrimp have already established in the wild in parts of Europe. CRS could easily survive in Australia, the water parameters of many of our creeks are very similiar to where they come from originally and what we maintain in our aquariums. Whilst it seems like shrimp couldnt do much damage if they got into the wild because they should be eaten by lots of predators, this isnt the case. Just three examples of the damage they could do are:

1. Introduce new diseases or parasites that have the potential to cause an epidemic in native shrimp which have no immunity to those dieases/parasites.

2. Potentially hybridise with native shrimp - this destroys the genepool of the native species, even to the point of sending the native extinct. Have a look at the Running River rainbowfish for an example of this happening right now. There is even an example where a native shrimp was released and is breeding with another native to create hybrids.

https://www.canberra.edu.au/about-uc/uc-foundation/what-can-i-support/tabs/research/running-river-rainbow-fish-fund

 

http://jhered.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/05/25/jhered.esw033.abstract

 

3. Exotic shrimp are highly fecund. they produce shrimplets as mini copies of themselves, and many of them. Many natives produce young that must develop through a series of planktonic stages and then return upstream. This gives the exotics an advantage where they can completely outcompete native shrimp for living space and resources, completely taking over. This changes the complete structure of the ecosystem - one shrimp does not perform the same habitat functions as another shrimp. 

There are many other reasons why non-native species are bad. Even moving native species from one area to another can have dire consequences (the running river rainbowfish is a great example of this too). If we as a hobby are to demonstrate that we can be trusted to keep our shrimp and not have our tanks nuked (like in WA or TAS), then we have to recognise the risks our shrimp pose and do everything we can to minimise the risk of our shrimp making it into the wild. The number one thing being that we should never release shrimp into the wild for any reason. 

 

 

 

 

11 minutes ago, Madmerv said:

Wow

I've had to type, delete, and re type this several times.

I'm still having trouble toning this down to acceptable levels. Ignorance of the law is no excuse for committing a crime and ignorance of the damage done by introduced species is why we have laws.

We have have waterways at every temp there is from 3C alpine streams to 32c Kimberly ones. All of them have native species living in them and all of them could be adversely affected by an introduced species.Even experts on this subject have trouble predicting what can go wrong.

Please do just a little bit of research, google it, on the destruction to native Australian waterways and wildlife from introduced species that were thought to be harmless.

Well said. I think you toned that down well. 

Edited by fishmosy
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Mitch91

I guess I overlooked this a lot. Cheers very well said 

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pastu

Going back to culling , i would like to point out that removing too large a proportion of the colony you wish to improve , gets  your there faster , but you reach a point of no further progress for lack of genetic variability.  I tend to cull the worst 20% of my colony once a month and observe a slow steady improvement. Hopefully my colony will continue to improve Long into the future. I have learnt about population genetics when i was interested in breeding fancy fowl, and kept up to date now that i am interested in shrimps and horses. The laws are the same.the greater the breeding population and the lower the percentage that is removed from reproducción, the healtier and more prolific will remain and the further the progress in recombining desirable caracters. A severe rate of culling makes your population very homogenous early on and improvement stops

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