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some riffle pics


fishmosy
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  • 4 months later...
39 minutes ago, neo-2FX said:

Was so awesome to see some of these in person at the championship! Top quality @fishmosy

Thanks mate. 

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Awesome to finally meet you too @fishmosy, hope to see you down here for the next show with a swag of cool natives! 

So the field trip section is looking a bit thin... what's happening? Don't tell me I have to go up to Cairns and take my own pics? 

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On 22 July 2016 at 11:05 PM, kizshrimp said:

Awesome to finally meet you too @fishmosy, hope to see you down here for the next show with a swag of cool natives! 

So the field trip section is looking a bit thin... what's happening? Don't tell me I have to go up to Cairns and take my own pics? 

I haven't had the time to go through all the pics and videos yet, as you know just started new job. I'm planning to find some time in the coming week so keep your eyes peeled. 

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Great looking shrimp @fishmosy I will be looking at getting some of these in the future, thanks for sharing the pics.

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