Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
shelbyw93

Blue velvets dieing after molt

Recommended Posts

shelbyw93

I have kept tropical fish tanks for years and have never had much of a problem

Recently my LFS got a batch of blue velvet shrimp in and I fell completely in love. The lfs told me they were pretty hardy and just had to be by themselves in order to successfully breed. I had a cycled 6 gallon that was sitting empty (with the exception of some nerites) that was months previously a betta tank. I brought home 5 of the bluest ones they had and everyone did great for about a week. I had my first shrimp molt but discovered it dead the next day. This pattern continued every few days until a month after their purchase when my last remaining blue velvet molted and died after about 24 hours. I was stumped as I kept them the same way I had been successfully keeping my fish without issue. The tank temp was 82 which I of course realized only after the loss of my last shrimp. As far as I know my other water parameters are within range for the shrimp. I contributed the deaths to the high temperature and removed the heater (making the water temp a consistent 75) and awaited the next shipment of blues to my LFS.

I purchased 6 more blue velvets about a week ago. Last night I found a molt and this morning I woke up to a blue dead on its side. All of the other shrimp acting completely normal. I'm stumped. I'm working on finding a copper test to see if my local water could be causing the deaths. Is there anything else you guys can think of? I'll post my tank parameters and pics of my setup below. Any suggestions would be great. Also if I find copper in the tap water what kind of water would you suggest I use (spring, RO, etc) If it doesn't end up being copper what's the next thing I should look for? Thank you in advance!!

34cb07dfa336c6efc90b09a0854c57ed.jpg

3c7859116ced50433bcbe466595f06da.jpg

378f26acd5543d51da120982b60e3126.jpg

a878613a3eb69a6892d89ce2d65fd5c1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc

Hi @shelbyw93,

Sorry to hear the news. 

The pH is a bit high at 7.8. It would be interesting to know the GH&KH readings too. 

Moulting issues are always related to water parameters. Can you get TDS readings?

Do you have a TDS pen? 

Read this... 

 

First thing to do is remove that cuttlefish bone.  It will no doubt be increasing TDS and possibly GH and KH

Then, do a 20% water change to reduce the hardness & pH. If you use tap water and the tap water is pH 7.8, then you need to look at using RO water to reduce pH, TDS, GH.

Have you tested your tap water parameters like pH and TDS so you know what you are working with?

If you can't use RO water, rain water can be an option if you don't live in a polluted city.

 

Edited by jayc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
shelbyw93

Thank you for your reply. I was under the impression they could be kept in a wide range of parameters as long as it was clean (low nitrogen wastes). I've obviously disproven this for myself. I can do RO water I have friends who keep marine tanks. Do you have to worry about the tank having too low mineral content for the shrimp or would I be doing a portion RO AND tap water in the tank to rectify that? Also I'll be moving back from college soon and the water there is well water that goes through a softener. They also have a drinking water filter. I suppose if water parameters were correct out of any of those sources it would be just as good as using RO mixed with tap? If you don't mind me asking because I've received conflicting information what pH, GH, KH, TDS, and hardness should I be aiming for? Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayc
40 minutes ago, shelbyw93 said:

I was under the impression they could be kept in a wide range of parameters as long as it was clean (low nitrogen wastes). I've obviously disproven this for myself.

Yeah, as you have found, shrimp can be difficult to keep outside of their preferred parameters.

 

42 minutes ago, shelbyw93 said:

Do you have to worry about the tank having too low mineral content for the shrimp or would I be doing a portion RO AND tap water in the tank to rectify that?

Yes you do. That's where a TDS meter will come in handy.

RO with a bit of tap water now for water changes to reduce your hardness, pH and TDS (I will assume TDS is high, given you have moulting issues).

But once you reach the ideal parameters, remineralising RO water is a must.

45 minutes ago, shelbyw93 said:

Also I'll be moving back from college soon and the water there is well water that goes through a softener. They also have a drinking water filter. I suppose if water parameters were correct out of any of those sources it would be just as good as using RO mixed with tap?

Not necessarily. I recommend testing any/all water sources that goes into your tank. Never assume it is ok.

Drinking water filters are usually slightly alkaline. That means it has a pH of 7 or higher.

48 minutes ago, shelbyw93 said:

what pH, GH, KH, TDS, and hardness should I be aiming for?

For a Neocaridina which is what a Blue Velvet is, aim for

pH = 6.8 - 7.2

GH = 8-9

KH = 2-4

TDS = 180 - 190.

 

I've listed a smaller target. Sure Neos can live in parameters slightly outside those ... but then again, "Aim small, miss small". 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  



  • Must Read SKF Articles

  • Join Our Community!

    Register today, ask questions and share your shrimp and fish tank experiences with us!

  • Posts

    • sdlTBfanUK
      In case it helps I have looked up the figures of the 2 tanks with cherry shrimp in them and they are as follows, Main tank     PH7,, GH5, KH2, TDS 225 (mixed water) Betta tank  PH7.5, GH6, KH3, TDS 222 (tap water + mineraliser) They are fairly similar to each other but neither is really in the 'IDEAL' recommendation range of CHERRY shrimp ,so it confirms that cherry shrimp are more adaptable and can thrive even outside those 'IDEAL' parameters? I suppose neither are that far out but it just shows there is a bit less necessity to get everything 100%, though if you aim for perfect you will probably get better results all round? Simon
    • jayc
      Oh, if you are planning on keeping Cherry shrimp aim for 6-8GH as Simon said above.
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Do you know what the water parameters are of this tank? Is the new male old enough to breed, assume it is as they only need to be 3 months I think but is that a possibility? Simon
    • sdlTBfanUK
      The usual GH range for Cherry shrimp is 6-8 and with the 1 part tap, 3 parts RO water mix you will be 50% there for G|H and just under 4 for KH! There are 2 products, one is GH+ and one is GH/KH+ so you need to get the right one for whichever route you plan to go, all RO water would be GH/KH+, mixed water would be GH+! IF you are planning the mixed route then that would be an easy adjustment you can do now by taking 25% water out and replacing with dechlorinated tap water, then adjust with the GH+ when you get it? This is the one I use, it is so simple as it is a liquid and even calculating is easy as each drop = +1gh (about 20ish TDS) / litre: https://www.pro-shrimp.co.uk/shrimp-king/803-shrimp-king-mineral-fluid-double-gh-4001615061413.html If you want to get this I have just done a dummy test on the website and you get delivery on it as long as it is one item, which is normal, but I thought you may need to pay as it is a bulky item to send? The soil should have lots of what the plants need I would have thought and the poop from the snails/shrimp must be some fertiliser? As JayC says you could leave the CO2 running for now as there are no shrimps, but I would probably turn it off and stop using fertiliser and just keep a close eye on the plants at this stage, after all you can start using them again IF the plants start looking unhealthy, but neither may be needed and it is better to know from the start and will make life easier long term. As I say I have never used either and my plants grow fantastic, in fact I wish they would grow slower, doh! Simon
    • jayc
      Ahhh ... the age old question of how to trigger your shrimp to breed. We will have to assume you have at least 1 male. What are you feeding them? Feed frozen bloodworms twice a week. The additional protein will give them more energy. Add more Indian Almond Leaves (aka Cattapa leaves) to the tank to promote more tannins and biofilm. Try raising temps to 23C or 74F. A 10% water change might help the females moult.
×
×
  • Create New...