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Notshrimpboy

How to improve shrimplet surivival rate

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Notshrimpboy

I have just joined SKF and looking for help from more experienced shrimp keepers. I have a 10G planted tank with lots of java ferns, mosses, annubias and water wisteria in Fluval plant/shrimp substrate. There is also a layer of duckweed on the water surface to remove nitrate. There is a sponge filter and a separate air stone for aeration. The water parameters are PH=7, KH=1, GH=4 and TDS=120. There are on average 10+ berried shrimps at any one time. But after 1.5 months, I can only find 3-4 babies surviving. The only other inhabitant of the tank are Assassin snails. Some of the berried shrimps lose the entire batch and I don't see any surviving babies. The shrimps are fed with ZooMed pellets and Shiakura powder. I only clean the glass on the front of the aquarium. And I do about a 10% water change every week with RO water and Seachem Equilibrium 

Please suggest what could be hurting the shrimplet survival rate.

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perplex

Welcome

May i ask what type of shrimp you are keeping

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Notshrimpboy

Sorry. I thought I had covered everything in my post but left out some key information. My post refers to crystal shrimps; both CRS and CBS.

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Disciple

Hello @Notshrimpboy

First of all welcome to SKF.

Now your WP look fine except for the ph, It is a little high for CRS & CBS but this alone should not cause your a low survival rate.

Have you checked for ammonia, nitrites and nitrate recently? What is the temperature of your tank?

How big is the colony? could the adults be out competing the shrimplets for food? What do you usually feed and how often?

Not many answer but hopefully we can find one for you.

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fishmosy

Assasian snails will eat shrimp but wont be solely responsible for the losses you have described. 

Do you target feed your newly hatched shrimplets?

Do you conduct large wate changes when new shrimplets are present?

During water changes, do you drip new water into the tank or pour it in (i.e. Are there likely to be substantial changes in water parameters during water changes?)

 

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Notshrimpboy

Thank you for everyone's queries and inputs. Please keep them coming.

I feed ZooMed pellets to the adults of about 1-2 pellets per day. I usually drop some Shiakura baby powder on the surface of the water that opens up to about a 2-3 inch (diameter) circle (5-7mm). The powder drops to the water column and on to the various plants and substrate. Therefore, I have not been target feeding the babies. I have not checked for nitrate, nitrite and ammonia but will do so later today. Since I use an aged sponge filter and have an abundance of immersed as well as emmersed plants, I had assumed that these parameters are not critical in my situation. I will double check now.

The colony is about 25-30 CRS/CBS. They are mostly adults. There are usually about 9-10 berried shrimps in the tank at any one time. I have also assumed, may be incorrectly, that just because conditions are fine for the adults to carry berries, they may not be good enough for the babies to survive.

When I change water (usually not more than 10%), I pre-mix the new water (RO) separately with Seachem Equilibrium and then drip them slowly into the sponge filter uplift tube. The new water is within 2-3 deg C of the tank water. The pH and TDS should be practically the same as the tank water.

Thanks for your help.

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Notshrimpboy

I forgot to mention that tank water temperature is 72F or 22.2C.

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Disciple
On ‎20‎/‎01‎/‎2016 at 5:55 AM, Notshrimpboy said:

Thank you for everyone's queries and inputs. Please keep them coming.

I feed ZooMed pellets to the adults of about 1-2 pellets per day. I usually drop some Shiakura baby powder on the surface of the water that opens up to about a 2-3 inch (diameter) circle (5-7mm). The powder drops to the water column and on to the various plants and substrate. Therefore, I have not been target feeding the babies. I have not checked for nitrate, nitrite and ammonia but will do so later today. Since I use an aged sponge filter and have an abundance of immersed as well as emmersed plants, I had assumed that these parameters are not critical in my situation. I will double check now.

The colony is about 25-30 CRS/CBS. They are mostly adults. There are usually about 9-10 berried shrimps in the tank at any one time. I have also assumed, may be incorrectly, that just because conditions are fine for the adults to carry berries, they may not be good enough for the babies to survive.

When I change water (usually not more than 10%), I pre-mix the new water (RO) separately with Seachem Equilibrium and then drip them slowly into the sponge filter uplift tube. The new water is within 2-3 deg C of the tank water. The pH and TDS should be practically the same as the tank water.

Thanks for your help.

Your water parameters all look fine, so I believe we can rule out wp issues. Only your Ph seems a little high.

Have you had a chance to check ammonia, nitrites and nitrates? any chance you can put a pic up of the tank. It might help us spot something.

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jayc

After reading all the info presented ... my immediate suspicion jumped to Nitrates as a possible cause.

Assuming you have a matured filter and Ammonia and Nitrites are zero, since the adults are ok.

Since you have not checked it, I would check Nitrates asap.

 

 

Edited by jayc

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larrymull

I know nitrates did me over in the past with shrimplet survival rates.

 

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jayc

And if Nitrates are high for Notshrimpboy, I'm sure Larrymull remembers what we did to reverse it ! :5565bf0371061_D:

 

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Clansman

I would consider soil or substrate for being toxic , when I first set up my first shrimp,tank Taiwan bees and f1s I was given bad advice to put bacter AE under the soil , I ended up with almost 20'females constantly berried but never saw a single baby , this went on for 4 months , I set up,a new tank moved over aprox 60 adults including berried females and within days had my first babies and survival was very high.

 My prl tank has been running for 18 months on red bee soil, but in the last 4 to 5 months survival of babies has really declined so couple of weeks ago I set up another and moved them over with new glasgarten soil , 5 days ago I had my first babies and tonight there foraging all over including the substrate and doing great .

I think with time our substrates level of bad bacteria build up, I am now using beemax to assist with healthy bacteria to try and break down waste etc , and in future if no breeding I will use a nano substrate cleaner 

 

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Notshrimpboy

Hi Everyone,

Thank you very much for your inputs. They are very valuable.

I had the water tested for Nitrate/Nitrite/Ammonia and they are all fine. They registered at the lowest level  on the test strip. The Fluval substrate in the tank is only about 3 months old. I started with new substrate in a new tank last September using aged sponge filter. It was left cycling for a month before I put CRS/CBS shrimps in it. They have been in there for 2+ months.

I am getting the sense that my setup may be just fine. Perhaps it was something that I did such as not rinsing my hands before I stuck them in the tank one time or changing water too drastically. I may just need to do less cleaning for the next several weeks to see if more shrimplets survive.

Thanks to everyone.

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  • Posts

    • jayc
      It can be done, but I wouldn't say it is without issues.  Without a buffering substrate the water conditions can be impacted by something very quickly. The pH will fall or rise very quickly, too quickly for Caridinas. So ... if you can be very careful with monitoring water parameters and keeping to a strict routine in maintaining the same-ish parameters week after week, than go for it. 
    • Jbio
      Yes I do...
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Great to hear everything is going nicely and you feel ready to start transferring more to the new tank. You were always going to have the PH difference as you are using soil but my cherry shrimp I have in both tanks thrive ok, it just means that you should drip acclimate them probably most of the day to be on the safe side and it is easy enough with the dripper to just leave it going all day. I am not advocating doing this, but as I was putting the cull shrimps into the new betta tank which had a low PH due to new substrate I just dumped them straight in and they were fine and I didn't see a dead one ever (I saw 10 the other day which is about the number I DUMPED in there) - they are much hardier/adaptable than the bee shrimps. I would do as you want/propose and try 10 for the first transfer! I really don't think you will have a problem with the PH difference but would do a long acclimatising to be safe. I have the same floating weed and mine grows really quickly but it is much easier to keep that under control than duckweed as when you get too many big ones you just remove a few. Incidentally when I do my weekly maintenance I trim off the longer bits of root to about 2 inches and it doesn't seem to harm them! You should probably keep a close eye on the tanks this week as we are supposed to be over 30 degrees most of the week. The smaller tank will be the one most at risk of excessive heat? I wish my reset shrimp tank was as lush and green as your new one - good job! I have added 17 shrimps so far and saw 8 yesterday? Simon
    • CurleyJones321
      Right so i've left the tanks and inhabitants for well this long simply because i dont want things to die off if i can help it and people have said leave it a month after establishing a tank before adding shrimp. Other than doing normal maintenance and transferring the 2 liters of old water from the small tank to the large each time and the large tank then getting an extra 2 liters of mineralised new water. Friday i sorted out all the tank decor in both tanks and adjusted the tank TDS to within 5TDS of each other. mainly because i needed to cull the flaoting plants which in the large tank the frogbit has taken over and in the small tank the water lettuce had almost taken over. the Duckweed has all but died out in both tanks not that i have done anything to aid it. my tanks now look like the attached. i then took readings they are as follows:-

      Small tank
      TDS - 232
      Temp - 23C
      PH - 7
      NH4 - Unreadable
      N03 - 1PPM
      N02 - 0.05PPM
      P04 - 2PPM
      dKH - 2
      dGH - 6

      Large Tank
      TDS - 237
      Temp - 24C
      PH - 5.5
      NH4 - Unreadable
      N03 - Unreadable
      N02 - Unreadable
      P04 - 1PPM
      dKH - 1
      dGH - 5

      So the Phosphate is up but thats because i was massively invasive in the tanks and churned up the fertaliser i have in the tank substrate. The PH is also what i would consider to be completely off

      also as a side note its worth mentioning that stressing plays out seems to stimulate them to give birth, i now have an extra at least 3 fry appear in the tank just after the works when the mothers had seemed to have stopped giving birth.

      i also got a new fish the in other breed of platy because the fish keeper at my LFS told me they could interbreed and it might make what im doing with the fish go faster, i got him today and named him Rodney and am about to add him to the Large Tank with Tyrone  before taking Tyrone out and putting more females in the tank with Rodney to let nature take its course. the Fish keeper did tell me to drip acclimate him however as the PH shock may be too much so that's what I'm currently doing and he's on his 2nd dip.

      that does make me wonder however can i now add shrimp to the tank or is the PH going to be a massive problem. i estimate i have between 60 and 100 shrimp in the small tank and want to transfer over say 10?
    • sdlTBfanUK
      Thanks for replying. I know what you mean about breeding, I started off with about 10 and was soon (couple of months) over 100, and  I am sure that would have kept going up if the tank could  have supported more??? I don't see any reason that it wouldn't work with bee shrimps if it is working so well for your cherry shrimp. Obviously the parameters are different but if you are managing to keep the cherry tanks stable I don't see why the bee would be any different, although they are a lot harder to keep! Worth a try though unless someone says otherwise? I shall certainly follow this with some interest. Simon 
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