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DemonCat

Algae Identification

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DemonCat

Hi all, 

Newbie here - assuming this is a basic algae? 
I undertake 20% water changes a week for my 3ft tank/100l tank. Tank has been set up for about 3-4 months.

I had my lighting at 9 hours a day but have read I may have increased the lighting too quickly (started at about 5 hours a day), so have also dropped that to 6 hours. 

Most prominent to see on my huge hunk of java moss, but I note all sides of the tank glass are actually pretty stained. I am surprised how quickly its popped up. 

 

You can note it on most of the java fern as a browny colour. 

Any clarification would be great! Thanks.

 

20151003_092212.jpg

Edited by DemonCat

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fishmosy

Do you have alot of shrimp in the tank? if not, they may not be able to keep up with the amount of algae growing in the tank. 

Reducing the light period will help but not eliminate the problem. Have you measured water parameters lately? In particular nitrate levels might give you an indication whether you are overfeeding and providing excess nutrients to fuel algae growth. 

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DemonCat

Thanks @fishmosy

I never really got to the bottom of this, but it kind of went away. Did not really change my water change habits... although did move house and do a clean out...

 

Tank is healthier than ever now!

Edited by DemonCat
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